MY BELOVED HOME TOWN ~ I grew up in the Pacific Northwest in an area known as the "Inland Empire." Now referred to as "The Inland Northwest," it includes Spokane and other communities in Eastern Washington ~ plus North Idaho's "Panhandle" with towns like Coeur d'Alene, Post Falls, Sandpoint, others.

THE FALLS ~ This region is truly a beautiful part of America ~ a wonderful place to live, raise families, and celebrate the four seasons. Spokane Falls are stunning ~ the city was originally named for them. Located in the heart of Downtown Spokane, thousands visit them every year. Several bridges span them, notably the Monroe Street Bridge embellished by architect Kirtland K. Cutter (see it in "The Downtown District" section below).

Highlight ~ In 2016, I was invited to show my art of the Monroe Street Bridge in the "Just the Bridge" exhibition at Spokane's William Grant Gallery. The event featured portraits of the setting created in several media from many local acclaimed artists.

MANITO PARK ~ This park at 18th & Grand Boulevard, with its Mirror Lake (pictured here), Duncan Garden, Conservatory, Rose Garden, Lilac Garden and more make it incredibly beautiful. I've painted over a dozen works of Manito.

See my recently completed NEW "Gathering at the Lovely Lilac Garden" below in the "Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens"section, on my Welcome page, and other pages throughout this website.

JUNE 12TH 2ND ANNUAL MANITO PARK ART SHOW ~ On June 12th, Manito Park will host its event on the lawn east of the Davenport Fountain about the same time as their famous Spring Plant Sale. My booth will feature 12+ images of the park (My NEW painting, "Gathering at Manito's Lovely Lilac Garden is featured below) and other Inland Northwest settings with prints, cards, NEW 2023 calendars, jigsaw puzzles (2 NEW), and more! Look for more info below and on my ART VENUES page.

 

 

THE BEGINNING ~ In 1871, the first white settler to stake a claim in Spokan Falls ("Falls" was later dropped and an "e" added to Spokane) was Seth Scranton. However, James N. Glover was largely known as the "Father of Spokane" as he shaped the area bordering the falls on both sides of them into a town. The railroad, timber and rich ore from the Inland Northwest brought enormous wealth ~ making millionaires of many, although a huge fire burned most of Spokane in 1889, slowing the city's growth.

KEY PLAYERS ~ Kirtland K. Cutter, Amasa Campbell, Patsy Clark, Daniel C. Corbin, F. Rockwood Moore, James N. Glover, Louis B. Davenport, Francis Cook, Aubrey White, J.J. Browne, A.M. Cannon, J.P. Graves, William Cowles and others gave the area in general and the city in particular, its complexion. These highly successful men built grand mansions for their families and imposing downtown buildings to proclaim their wealth. Remarkably, many structures are still in immaculate condition.

PRESERVATION & THE TOP 10 ~ After World War II, when other cities were tearing down structures, an economic slump had folks in Spokane restoring properties. The South Hill in particular is filled with homes built in the '20s, '30s and '40s ~ many as pretty as when originally constructed.

Add to that the school system, manicured golf courses, bike trails and beautiful parks. Manito Park's Mirror Lake (pictured above)with its paved path around its perimeter is one of Doug and my favorite places ~ beautiful in all four seasons. Spokane's very active Spokane Preservationist Advocates (SpokanePreservation.org) respects what a jewel Spokane is and works diligently to keep it that way. Also, from the 1950s into the late 1990s, property at nearby lakes was still affordable, so many families purchased vacation lots in which to spend Spokane's hot dry Summers.

Highlight ~ Recently, AARP Magazine rated Spokane among the top 10 regions in the U.S. for its quality of life. "Baby Boomers" who grew up here are coming home.

FULL CIRCLE ~ In late December 2011, Doug and I moved from the Seattle area back to Spokane. We were both born here, although Doug grew up on Bellevue's Clyde Hill. Fond childhood memories inspired much of the artwork in this collection as the community is filled with endless inspiring subjects for an "Americana" artist like me to recreate. If you grew up here, you'll see dozens of beloved familiar settings below.

 

ENJOY THIS SPRING TOUR OF SPOKANE AND THE SURROUNDED REGION!

 

SEVEN REGIONAL GROUPS

I've divided this collection into seven groups, some with sub-categories ~ each with two paintings. These highlight neighborhoods, communities and well-known beloved regional areas. I have created 250+ Spokane paintings, so the artwork shared on my website revolves with the seasons and their holidays. NOTE ~ I've also completed dozens of sketches for clients ~ some on my Commission page, plus a handful of others at the foot of this and the Puget Sound page.

The groups include ~

 

NEW ARTWORK, MY CREATIVE PROCESS, ENTIRE COLLECTIONS PDFS, AND "THE BIG LIST"

 

ENJOY ~ And click on Ordering for details on purchasing any of the artwork featured here (Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express).

 

SPOKANE'S DOWNTOWN DISTRICT ~ BELOVED PRESTIGIOUS LANDMARKS PLUS "FUN" LEGENDARY CITY SETTINGS

The Entire Downtown District Collection pdf ~ Click on the 3-page pdf to see and learn about all 11 paintings in the "Downtown District" collection.

"SPOKANE'S HISTORIC STEAM PLANT" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Spokane’s historic steam plant was designed and built by the renowned architectural firm of Cutter & Malmgren in 1916. Their handiwork and that of later visionaries inspired this art celebrating the setting’s 100th birthday.

The plant supplied steam heat to much of Spokane’s Downtown District for nearly 70 years. When providing this service ultimately became too expensive, Washington Water Power closed the plan, shutting off the last boiler in 1986.

After 10 years of vacancy and an uncertain future, WWP formed Steam Plant Square, LLC. Working with an enlightened team of historic-minded businesses including Wells & Co., life was breathed back into the structure along with two others that were folded into the project. Special care was taken to maintain the Steam Plant’s unique original personality, infrastructure and equipment during the process of creating office, retail and dining space. The iconic stacks on the city skyline were saved for future generations.

The Steam Plant was the first Spokane building to receive the National Preservation Honor Award in 2001, and went on to be listed on the National, Sate and Spokane Registers of Historic Places.

Highlight ~ This iconic setting was recently purchased by civic-minded Spokane developer, Jerry Dicker.

 

"FLYING SOUTH OVER SPOKANE FALLS (HUNTINGTON PARK)" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Not only did famed architect Kirtland K. Cutter create dozens of beautiful homes and handsome landmark buildings in Spokane, he also lent his design flair to other projects.

This portrayed the majestic Monroe Street Bridge, which spanned the river at the west end of downtown Spokane. In 1910, John Ralston, Spokane’s city engineer and designer of the grand bridge, invited Cutter to design its decorative handrails and lookout stations, which featured life-size reliefs of bison skulls.

The photo here showed the bridge just after its construction. In the background was another famous landmark, the Washington Water Power Post Street Substation. Cutter designed that massive brick and basaltic rock industrial building in 1909.

Recently, Huntington Park situated on the south side of the falls was given a formal restoration with the installation of lawn, a basaltic rock terraced gardens and assorted decorative plantings ~ creating a very inviting space for folks to not only view the cascading water, but stay a while and enjoy a picnic in the scenic spot.

Highlight ~ WWP’s first CEO, Frank Rockwood Moore, gave Cutter one of his first residential commissions ~ a stunning Turdor-Revival (now demolished) on the property between the D.C. Corbin House and the F. Lewis Clark House which later served as the parking lot for the restored Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens.

 

 

MANITO AND OTHER COUNTY & STATE PARKS AND GARDENS ~ SETTINGS WITHIN SPOKANE'S CITY LIMIITS PLUS STATE PARKS IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST ~ INCLUDING MOUNT SPOKANE

Entire Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens Collection pdf ~ Click on the 6-page pdf to see and learn about all 28 paintings in the "Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens" collection.

 

LEGENDARY MANITO PARK ~ BELOVED TEN-ACRE SOUTH HILL SETTING THAT OPENED IN 1904

NEW! "SPRING PHOTOS AT THE LOVELY LILAC GARDEN" (MANITO PARK, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED FEBRUARY 2022 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10 -INCH)  

Manito Park (TheFriendsOfManito.org) is THE perfect setting for Spring photos. Duncan Garden, Rose Hill, and the Lilac Garden often find photographers capturing images for Senior Proms, graduation, engagements, weddings, Easter, Mother's Day ~ and other special occasions like the one in this painting. The art here pictured our Simpson family in about 1957.

J.J. Browne, for whom the city's oldest neighborhood is named (Browne's Addition), introduced Spokane to lilacs in 1906, planting two in his yard. In 2012, Superintendent John Duncan began adding them to the Manito, spawning the trend of folks planting them in neighborhoods.

In 1932, Manito's zoo closed, and the area which housed the buffalo became the Lilac Garden in 1941. Spokane celebrated its first Lilac Festival in 1938, adopting the name, "The Lilac City." For decades in May, the Armed Forces Lilac Parade wound through the Downtown District.

 In 1999, the special Syringa Spokane Lilac was developed ~ a hybrid of deep purple with white tips. In 2008, several were added to Manito's Lilac Garden ~ some still thriving there when I completed this fine art.

Highlight ~ "King Ranger" was the zoo's favorite buffalo. When he passed away, the city had him stuffed and added to the taxidermy at the Cheney Cowles Museum ~ now the MAC.

 

“THE SWANS AT MIRROR LAKE (MANITO'S DUCK POND)” (MANITO PARK, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Duck Pond at Manito Park (TheFriendsOfManito.org) has been altered quite a bit over the years from the setting shown in this fine art.

Known in its youth as Mirror Lake, it was larger, offering a welcome home to the ducks and swans that came to live there during the warmer months. Sadly, the beautiful swans were killed in a malicious prank by some cruel. teenagers. As a remembrance of them, the local Junior League had a swan ornament created by the "Olde World Christmas" folks and we have three of them hanging on our tree every year.

Other casualties were the signature weeping willow trees that were so weakened by the devastating ice storm of 1996 and the early October snowfall of 2019 that the Spokane Parks and Recreation Department was forced to cut many of them down.

But the pond has had its revenge, wreaking havoc with some of the homes west of it with its “fingers” of underground streams flooding basements during Spring run-off months.

Recently the park has enjoyed several improvements, some affecting the pond. One was the addition of a paved walkway around the perimeter of the pond ~ no more slogging through the mud on rainy days!

Highlight ~When Mirror Lake was new and ran all the way from Division Street to Grand Boulevard), historic photos showed that a large dance pavilion was on its shoreline.

 

 

SPOKANE COUNTY & STATE PARKS AND GARDENS ~ SETTINGS WITHIN SPOKANE'S CITY LIMIITS PLUS INLAND NW STATE PARKS, INCLUDING MOUNT SPOKANE

"THE GOLDEN CAROUSEL" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, RIVERFRONT PARK, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In 1909, I.D. Looff finished his stunning carouse (SpokaneCarousel.org) ~ elaborate in every detail with dozens of multi-sized mirror panels and 180 glittering lights. Too expensive for its original home at Natatorium Park at a price of $20,000, Looff struck a special deal. If the park would allow his son Louis Vogel to run the carousel and other concessions on a percentage basis, Looff would ship the carousel to the park as a wedding gift for his daughter Emma.

When Natatorium Park closed in 1968, its property developed into a mobile home park, the carousel was dismantled and stored. With the opening of Spokane’s World Fair, Expo 74 at 100-acre Riverfront Park, the most anticipated events was the re-opening of the carousel ~ not just for viewing, but for riding!

A few years ago, a bond was passed to update and make improvements to Riverfront Park. This included the construction on a new custom protective structure for the vintage merry-go-round.

Highlight ~ In late Spring 2018, Mayor Condon opened its doors and the elegant Looff Carousel began spinning again for her eager riders.

 

"RIDING AT THE 'JACK RABBIT' AT NAT" (THE NORTH SIDE • PAINTED JUNE 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH))


Historic Natatorium Park held lots of great memories for Spokane “baby-boomers” ~ and their parents before them!

The amusement park on the Spokane River had dozens of rides at the height of its popularity, but the two favorites were the Looff carousel and the Jack Rabbit roller coaster.

The Jack Rabbit was a thrilling ride around dizzying tracks that lasted about a minute and a half. Each trip left its riders breathless and “lunch-less” if they had eaten too many hot dogs and cotton candy.

It broke the heart of every Spokane kid when the park closed in 1968, but it had lost money for years with other events going on in the city and folks heading to nearby lakes in Summer. To add insult to injury, when Nat closed, the grand roller coaster was dismantled and burned to the ground.

Highlight ~ My cousin Jim Flemister tricked me into riding the roller-coaster just as soon as the height and age regulations made me eligible. It scared the heck out of me, but to this day I remember it as the most thrilling ride ever!

 

BROWNE'S ADDITION ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, "HOME SWEET HOMES" AND THE MAC'S RESTORED AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE

Entire Browne's Addition Collection pdf ~ Click on the 7-page pdf to see and learn about all 34 (17 Browne's Addition settings / 17 Campbell House) paintings in the "Browne's Addition" collection.

 

BROWNE'S ADDITION SMALL BUSINESSES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ SPOKANE'S FIRST AND OLDEST NEIGHBORHOOD

NEW! "PINK PALACE ON PACIFIC (AVENUE)" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2021 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I have painted very few pink residences, as this color home is not easy to find in Spokane, Washington. Frequently, Spokane’s vintage grand houses were Tudor-Revival, Federal, Colonial or Prairie-style and constructed of durable materials like basaltic rock, brick, granite or stucco.

In Port Townsend, Snohomish and Walla Walla ~ communities known for their historic Carpenters’ Gothic Victorians, visitors stand a better chance of finding mansions painted pink.

But, lucky me. I discovered this inviting pink “palace” on Pacific Avenue in Browne‘s Addition near Coeur d’Alene Park. No doubt constructed many decades ago, little was available on its history. It may have been a single-family dwelling that was converted into an apartment house after World War II when the city encouraged this practice to accommodate returning servicemen in need of homes in which to start their families.

Highlight ~ I gave this artwork a gardening theme with my husband Doug and me planting pink impatiens and hydrangeas in the front flower beds.

 

"BALLOONS & BLOSSOMS AT THE 1899 HOUSE B&B" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED FEBRUARY 2020 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome historic Victorian, located at the east end of Spokane’s oldest neighborhood at 1728 First Avenue, was designed by renowned architect Loren Rand in 1899 for the Powell family. Edward Louis Powell served the fledgling community as its 10th mayor.

When I finished my portrait of it, Louie Flores and Gillian Cranehahn were the proprietors of this fine inn and private residence, perfectly named “1899 House B&B” (1899-House-Bed-Breakfast.Business.Site). Extensive renovation had been completed on the structure ~ including a restoration of the home’s original exterior color scheme. With helpful grants from Spokane Preservation Advocates (SPA), the couple created an inviting, gracious, hospitable place for folks to stay.

Over the years, Louie and Gillian have been active members in the Browne’s Addition Neighborhood Council. This organization helped ensure the historic preservation of the neighborhood as a formal historic district with assistance from the city’s Historic Preservation Office and SPA.

Highlight ~In 2016, I painted a portrait of Browne’s Addition’s Coeur d’Alene Park (Spokane’s first and oldest) for a raffle that the stewardship group Friends of Coeur d’Alene Park held for nearly a year to raise much needed funds for park improvements. Gillian held the winning ticket and the original painting found a place of honor in the B&B’s Rigsby Suite.

 

 

THE MAC'S AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE ~ GRACIOUS LIVING FOR THE CAMPBELLS AND THE STAFF WHO LOOKED AFTER THEM IN THE LATE 1800S AND EARLY 1900S

NEW! "TULIPS, TEDDY BEARS AND TWIN BEDS" (CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, THE MAC, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 5X7-INCH)

I took a bit of poetic license with this guest room next to the Campbell’s Linen room. It was devoid of wallpaper and other accoutrements when I took photos of it over a decade ago when I began work on my Campbell House (NorthwestMuseum.org) collection.

Regardless, the room’s two matching twin-size “posters” were charming and delightful ~ perhaps making it the perfect guest room for visiting youngsters.

In addition to our kittiewinks Andy and Sophie, I included a huge container of multi-colored tulips marching across the fireplace mantle.

Highlight ~ I also tucked two friendly teddy bears into this scene as in 1902, famed Richard Steiff introduced his iconic stuff teddy bears (named for President Theodore Roosevelt) ~ roughly the same time that the Campbells were beginning life in their recently completed home in Browne’s Addition, Spokane’s first and oldest residential neighborhood.

 

"THE LOVELY LINEN ROOM" (CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, THE MAC, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2011 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 8X10-INCH)

Tucked into the southeast corner of the second floor, this room caught the morning sun and must have been a cheerful place to be on sunny days. The north wall had built-in shelves and drawers for storing the bedding and other fine linens that a fine residence like the Campbell House (NorthwestMuseum.org) required.

Grace and Helen stayed abreast of the latest fashions and shunned ready-to-wear. They visited several salons in New York and ordered garments from there, Boston and San Francisco. Once or twice a year, a fine seamstress used this room for a couple of weeks to measure and sew for the family. I’ve pictured the wire dress form and the sewing machine ~ no electricity required as this apparatus used “foot power.”

Highlight ~ Helen’s elegant tea dress pictured hanging on the shelving in this fine art was selected in 1917 from Eugenia’s Gowns of New York.

 

THE PRESTIGIOUS SOUTH HILL ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS ~ CANNON HILL / MANITO / CABLE ADDITIONS, CLIFF PARK, HIGH DRIVE, LOWER SOUTH HILL, MORAN PRIARIE, ROCKWOOD, OVERBLUFF, SOUTH PERRY DISTRICT AND MORE

Entire South Hill Collection pdf ~ Click on the 17-page pdf to see and learn about all 83 intings in the "South Hill" collection.

 

THE SOUTH HILL'S PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES ~ ICONIC CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED SMALL BUSINESSES

"PARISHIONERS AT FIRST PRESBYTERIAN" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY 2018 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

(Crossover with the Downtown District Collection)

Reverend Thomas G. Watson arrived in Spokane, WA from Wisconsin to lead Spokane’s initial First Presbyterian congregation in 1883 when Washington was not yet a state. At the time, there was no formal church building, so services were held in various public settings around the community while funds were raised to build a church.

The first church was located on Monroe and Riverside, but the newspaper negotiated the purchase of the property three short years later and ultimately the Review Building took its place. The congregation moved temporarily to the Falls City Opera House, which burned down in the 1889 Great Spokane Fire.

The second location for a church was the corner of Second Avenue and Jefferson, and ultimately in 1910 to the Gothic Revival-style structure designed by architect Loren Leighton Rand at 318 South Cedar Street. The church was stunning with stained glass windows emulating Paris’ Sainte Chapelle and one of the most imposing pipe organs in Spokane. In the early 1950s, the growing congregation added a gymnasium, classrooms and a commercial-style kitchen.

First Presbyterian Church has remained an iconic Spokane structure for over a century ~ nicknamed irreverently by some as “Hogwarts” after the ornate school of wizardry featured in the popular “Harry Potter” movies.

Highlight ~ In 1892, the First Presbyterian Church on Jefferson hosted the funeral of Chief Spokane Gary.

 

"FAMILY, FRIENDS & FLOWERS (SAINT AUGUSTINE'S)" (, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTE DOCTOBERY 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When I grew up in Spokane, my first twelve years were spent at Saint Augustine’s (StAugustineSpokane.CatholicWeb.com) parish where our family attended Mass and grade school on Spokane’s South Hill. The school building functioned as the church for decades, but in the 1940s, Father (later Monsignor) Stephen P. Buckley drove the fund-raising for a new church.

“Family, Friends & Flowers (Saint Augustine’s)” (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA •
PAINTED OCTOBER 2014 • 8X10-INCH)

This was the fourth painting I created of Saint Augustine’s parish (StAugustineSpokane.CatholicWeb.com) ~ honoring it in all four seasons. Although the parish was formed in 1914, this structure was the second church that served the folks who worshipped there.

Designed by the John Maloney architectural firm, it opened its doors in September 1950. Pastor Stephen P. Buckley spearheaded the creation of stunning terraced gardens honoring the seven sorrows of Mary, but the flower beds that framed the church were equally lovely. Planted with dozens of tulips, I painted them in full bloom here ~ a breathtaking backdrop for the spring celebration of family and friends pictured in this piece.

Highlight ~ The folks attending Mass were the McCarthy girls Maggie and Sally as youngsters in the yellow dresses; the Arpin family; niece Kelly Barton and her husband David; daughter Leah, husband Sean Davies and sons Connor and Nathan; and my sisters Marilee and Peggy and me as youngsters on the bench in the background.

 

 

SOUTH HILL "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ BUNGALOWS, CAPE CODS, DUTCH COLONIALS, FOURSQUARES, TUDORS, VICTORIANS, AND MORE

“NINTH AVENUE ~ SPRINGTIME CELEBRATION (JAMES & ELIZABETH COMSTOCK)” THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2003 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

)The theme of this fine art setting was a handsome Tudor mansion on Easter Sunday. Although our family never lived in this house, I pictured all of us on the lawn.

Just home from Sunday Mass at Saint Augustine’s, we Simpsons were focused on filling up our Easter baskets as Lent (and the tradition of giving up sweets) was finally over. We were ready for chocolate eggs and bunnies!

This residencel was one of four similar Comstock-Shadle houses adjacent to each other on 9th Avenue. Loren L. Rand was the architect who designed and built this home for James and Elizabeth Comstock in 1905.

Rand may be best known for his work on nearby Lewis & Clark High School.

Highlight ~ My sisters and I were quite proud of the “sailor suits” we were wearing in this art that our mother Sally sewed for us. When I recently found my second grade 1957 class picture, there was I was in my sailor suit!

 

"SALLY'S SECRET SDREAM HOUSE (PIERCE MANSION)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED APRIL 1998• ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The two-story historic Pierce mansion was built on 13th Avenue in the early 1900s next to the Ferris Dutch-Colonial. Spectacular when originally built, its most famous resident was Henry Pierce who was a noted writer for the The Spokane Chronicle and a very active El Katif Shriner responsible for helping develop the Shriners’ Children’s Hospital.

It must have been spectacular when originally built, but in the 1990s when my mother Sally drove me by the property, it was in terrible shape with a lengthy restoration project ahead. She shared she’d always dreamed of buying the place and bringing it back to its former beauty ~ which was in process when I painted its portrait and was finally recently finished.

Highlight ~ I painted this as a Mother’s Day gift, celebrating my mom and her lifelong beloved bridge buddies since they met as young wives in 1947. Sally and only three others are still alive and in their 90s (*). L to R second floor) Mae Fay, Winnie Robinson, Joan Eugene, Dorothy Rouse* and Harriet Lundquist; (L to , front walkway) my mother Sally*, Dolores Allers* and Geneva Maloney*.

 

 

 

THE HISTORIC NORTH SIDE ~ SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA COLLECTION, CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN CORBIN PARK, GARLAND, INDIAN TRAIL, LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER, LOGAN, NETTLETON, WEST POINT ROAD, THE UNIVERSITY DISTRICT AND MORE

The Entire North Side Collection pdf ~ Click on the 7-page pdf to see and learn about all 31 paintings in the "North Side" collection.

NORTH SIDE'S SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA COLLECTION ~ FATHER JOSEPH CATALDO S.J.'S RENOWNED CHRISTIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM IN SPOKANE

"DAFFODILS IN THE RAIN AT DESMET" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • APRIL 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Construction began by John Huetter on Gonzaga University's (Gonzaga.Edu) first and oldest dormitory on 1925. A stonemason and brick layer, Huetter also built College Hall and the Huetter House ~ the old Bishop White Seminary which became the G.U. Alumni House decades later. At a cost of $98,000, the men-only facility originally offered students 72 double rooms.

In 1924, Gonzaga mounted the acclaimed passion play “Golgatha” for Spokane and raised $7,000 towards the cost of the dorm’s construction. On October 25th, 1927, DeSmet Hall opened, followed by a football game between Idaho and Gonzaga. Gonzaga won 12 to 3 and funds from ticket sales also went to the building fund.

In this piece, I pictured folks in shirts spelling out “G.U. Bulldogs” ~ (Left to Right) Teresa and Sean Mulholland (Sean lived in DeSmet Hall and met Teresa at G.U.),Sean’s folks Bill and Carol Mulholland, me and husband Doug (my father was a graduate of G.U. and its law school, and taught night law classes part time after World War II), and Joe and Mary Doohan (Joe graduated from Gonzaga and Mary spent a year in Italy as part of the G.U. Florence program).

Highlight ~ Rumor had it that famous crooner and movie star Bing Crosby was kicked out of school when he threw a piano out of DeSmet Hall ~ untrue as he had already moved to Hollywood, California in early 1924 when construction was just beginning on the dormitory.

 

"BOZARTH MANSION IN BLOOM" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • APRIL 2010 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In 1911-1913, this mansion was built for historic Spokane developer J.P. Graves by the renowned local architect Kirtland K. Cutter for about $100,000. The famed Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, MA designed the extensive gardens and an elaborate underground water system.

In addition to owning one of Spokane’s trolley lines, Graves was also reputed to have the largest herd of jersey cattle on the west coast. The estate was originally called “Waikiki” in honor of the island Graves visited in the Hawaiian Islands and also because of the nearly two-dozen streams that ran through his property near the Little Spokane River. NOTE ~ “Waikiki” means lots of rushing water.

In 1963, the mansion was purchased by Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.Edu) and began functioning as its retreat center. This setting has also hosted dozens of weddings and other special events over the decades when not functioning as the retreat center. Its gardens have always been legendary

Highlight ~ In the 1960s, our family lived next door to the Bozarth family ~ distant relatives of the folks who owned this property after J.P. Graves.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S PUBLIC PLACES ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED BUSINESSES, INCLUDING THE SPOKANE COUNTY COURTHOUSE

"FRESH FLOWERS AT SAINT JOSEPH'S" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I painted this portrait of Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church to honor its 125th birthday. Jesuit Leopold Van Gorp purchased the West Central neighborhood property at the corner of Dean Avenue and Walnut Street in 1890 and sold it to the Corporation of Roman Catholic Bishops of Nisqually, Washington Territory.

A frame church was originally built on the site, but as the parish grew, German-born Julius A. Zittell (named Washington’s “State Architect” in 1987) was tapped to design a new church and later a convent. The church was constructed in 1901 of brick masonry in the Late Gothic Revival style and the convent in 1924 in the Collegiate Gothic style.

This church featured many fine Gothic architectural details including its handsome steeple, stepped buttresses and beautifully detailed stained-glass windows. It was enlarged in 1909, but other than that, very few exterior alterations were made over its more than 100 years of service. Only Our Lady of Lourdes (1881) parish held the distinction of being older than Saint Joseph’s in the young, thriving community.

Highlight ~ A 1901 issue of the Spokesman Review described Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church as “one of the prettiest small churches in the Northwest.”

 

"DOYLE'S DARLING ICE CREAM" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Located in the midst of Spokane’s West Central neighborhood on the North Side on the corner of Boone and Nettleton, this whimsical red and white signature “landmark” was built in 1939 as the Pacific Northwest was climbing out of the Great Depression.

For decades, it overlooked the trolley line tracks on Boone Avenue that carried passengers to and from beloved Natatorium Park. It was a favorite spot for folks to stop and purchase ice cream treats.

Nat Park closed in 1968 and its site became the San Souci Mobile Home Park. The West Central area fell on difficult times, making it quite a challenge for the little ice cream shop to keep going.

Years later in the 2000s, the Kendall Yards development began to take shape. This new neighborhood overlooking the Spokane River from the north bank helped to breathe life back into the ice cream shop. It was recently spruced up with a shiny new coat of paint and other improvements.

Highlight ~ From the 1930s on, Doyle’s always had a reputation for its delicious homemade flavors. in 2013, the parlor was voted #6 for the very finest ice cream out of 11 Spokane establishments.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ BUNGALOWS, DUTCH COLONIALS, FOURSQUARES, SALT BOXES, VICTORIANS AND MORE

"HISTORIC BLEEKER HOUSE" ( THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was a portrait I completed of the historic North Side home built for Harry and Katherine Bleeker in 1909. A Dutch descendent, Bleeker was once secretary/vice president of Spokane's Washington Water Power Company.

Famed architect C. Ferris White designed the home in the Dutch Colonial Revival style, influenced by 1700-1800s farmhouses in New York's Hudson River Valley. Architectural details included multi-paned windows, louvered shutters and rare flared-roof eaves.

Owners of the home at the time of the MAC (Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture) Mother’s Day Tour of Historic Homes in 2009 had completed a remarkable renovation ~ bringing the residence back to its authentic period beauty. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Spokane.

Highlight ~ One of my high school Holy Names Academy classmates, Heather Hennessey, grew up in the magnificent home overlooking the Spokane River and historic old Fort George Wright.

 

NEW! "FUN FAMILY CELEBRATION" (INDIAN TRAIL, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This friendly artwork portrayed a charming ranch-style home in the Indian Trail neighborhood near the Five-Mile area on Spokane’s North Side. When I painted this, good friends the Capryes had shared life there 21 years.

“Celebration” was the theme that day as it was dad Mike Caprye’s birthday in Spring 2020 ~ the family’s first get-together since COVID-19 put a damper on fun gatherings like this.

I positioned parents Mike and Peggy behind their kids with their sweethearts, plus nine grand-kiddos holding a flag banner that spelled “C-E-L-E-B-R-A-T-I-O-N-!”

Highlight ~ Note the University of Washington “Husky” colors sprinkled throughout the piece (Mike and Peggy’s alma-mater).

 

 

THE SPOKANE VALLEY ~ PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, INCLUDING ARBOR CREST CELLLARS, AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS ~ FRUIT HILL ROAD, KOKOMO, MILLWOOD, NORTHWOOD, UNIVERSITY AND MORE

The Entire Spokane Valley Collection pdf ~ Click on the 5-page pdf to see and learn about all 17 paintings in the "Spokane Valley" collection.

"CLIFF HOUSE AT ARBOR CREST CELLARS" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2012 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The handsome, Florentine-style Cliff House was built to take full advantage of the view of the Spokane Valley. It was designed and built by Royal Newton Riblet in 1924. An inventor and mechanical genius,

Riblet’s estate was filled with marvels for its time like his garage with its mechanical door. He also installed a waterfall that recycled water back to the top of the falls and a life-size chess game on his grounds. The property with its three-story mansion, basaltic rock out-buildings and marvelous gardens later became the headquarters of Arbor Cellars (ArborCrest.com).

Highlight ~ When Riblet was living there, the cement factory far below on the riverside spewed harmful dust into the air, deteriorating his mansion’s facade. He sued ~ and the attorneys who won the first ever case of its kind were associates James Winton and my father Joseph A. Simpson.

 

"MILLWOOD'S ROSEBUSH COTTAGE, MARGUERITE STREET" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED MAY 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This Tudor-influenced Norman-Revival cottage was built in 1923 by Waldo Rosebush, general manager of the Inland Empire Paper Company. The paper company was Millwood’s largest employer for nearly a century.

Rosebush had spent time in France during World War I where he discovered the prototype for this finely detailed, beautifully crafted cottage in the Argonne Forest. He purchased the architectural plans from the French owner and built his home a short distance from the main thoroughfare through Millwood, aptly named Argonne

.In 1936, Rosebush left the mill to work with the army in Alaska and the Pacific, ultimately retiring to Appleton, Wisconsin. However, he loved his charming cottage so much that he kept it as his official residence ~ returning annually to visit friends and vote in Spokane’s local elections until he passed away in 1961. Highlight ~ This cottage was built in a tiny pocket of historic homes just off Argonne a few blocks from the paper mill in Millwood.

Highlight ~ The residence was probably the most noteworthy one in the Spokane Valley other than Royal Riblet's Cliff House at Arbor Crest Cellars.

 

 

GREATER INLAND NORTHWEST AND NORTH IDAHO ~ PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, SMALL BUSINESSES, WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY, AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN LATAH CREEK VALLEY , PEND O'REILlLE RIVER, NEWMAN LAKE, AND IDAHO'S COEUR D'ALENE, HAYDEN, SANDPOINT, AND MORE

The Entire Greater Inland NW/North Idaho Collection pdf ~ Click on the 4-page pdf to see and learn about all 19 paintings in the "Greater Inland Northwest & North Idaho" collection.

 

"MAPLE TREE FARM" (HANGMAN VALLEY, SPOKANE, WA • DECEMBER 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Arpin Family (L-R Lori and Greg with daughters Sarah and Megan) pictured in this home portrait, founded their beloved home in Hangman Valley in 1992. Architect McKie Wing Roth (Maine) and builder Gene Plett created this authentic reproduction of an 18th Century New England farm where the family lived for 28 years.

Joining them were Golden Retriever Grace, kitties Milly and Lilly, and a flock of buff-colored hens ruled by rooster Bob Dylan. A farm indeed, the Arpins planted maple (thus the name), oak and spruce trees, a small crop of alfalfa, a vineyard, an apple orchard and a truly lovely enclosed garden of raised beds with a greenhouse in the center.

Additionally, the farm had a little red barn, a swimming pool and pump house with special touches like a black school bell (Lori was a teacher at Cataldo Catholic School for 30 years), a cannon, weather vanes, birdhouses and toile curtains that dressed the windows of this remarkable home. With newlyweds Sarah and Megan married and starting their families ~ and retirement looming for the couple, it was time to downsize to a smaller cottage near Cannon Hill Park.

Highlight ~ To honor their wonderful life in Hangman Valley, Lori commissioned this memory-filled portrait of their beloved Maple Tree Farm.

 

"VISITING THE COZY CABIN ON SUNVALE" (PEND OREILLE RIVER, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 2020 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS •8X10 -INCH)

When I was a toddler on Spokane’s Lincoln Street, the first playmates I had were the Roberts’ kids who moved to the Dutch Colonial on the corner lot next to ours on Lincoln Street ~ Tracy, Molly, Mac and Sue Anne. Molly was my favorite and we’ve been friends for decades.

She married Cecil Hannan, and after years of living in San Diego, the couple moved back to Spokane’s South Hill. One evening, Cecil asked Molly, “Where is ‘The Lake’”? My friends are all going there this weekend.” Molly explained that “The Lake” was an umbrella term for dozens of lakes and rivers in the Inland Northwest within a couple hours drive of Spokane. Many families in the area had vacation cottages.

“Should we have one?” Cecil asked. Thus the birth of this pretty cabin overlooking the Pend Oreille River ~ one of Molly’s favorite places on the planet and frequently filled with family and friends.

Highlight ~ I finished the painting to honor a fun weekend Doug and I spent with Molly at her hideaway. A friendly moose was lurking near this river property during our visit and I pictured him just to the right of the cabin in this artwork. I added Molly's daughter Mimi and husband Mark when they moved from San Diego to Spokane.

 

 

Click on BIG LIST • SPOKANE COLLECTION OR the Red Pointer graphic header here to access ALL the titiles in thIs collection. Titles of art in this Spring 2022 edition are in RED CAPS alphabetically by group. These link you with bold red type to pages throughout the web site.

 

 

BEST WISHES FOR A BEAUTIFUL SPRING SEASON!

 

 

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