MY BELOVED HOME TOWN AND BEYOND ~ I grew up in the Pacific Northwest in an area known as the "Inland Empire" when I was a youngster. The region, which is now called the "Inland Northwest," includes Spokane and other friendly communities in Eastern Washington plus North Idaho's "Panhandle" with Coeur d'Alene, Hayden, Sandpoint and other small communities.

This is truly a beautiful part of America ~ a wonderful place to live and celebrate the four seasons. The city's focal point is the majestic Spokane Falls. There is an upper section (pictured here, and a lower one (find my painting of the lower one ~ also featuring the Monroe Street Bridge, further down on this page in the "Downtown District."

Folks love to take the footbridge shown here to cross the river from the Downtown District to the North Side / Gonzaga University area. The island has a seating area that shares historical information on its east side ~ which is also a great place for a picnic!

THE BEGINNING ~ In 1871, the first white settler to stake a claim in Spokan Falls ("Falls" was later dropped and an "e" added to Spokane) was Seth Scranton. However, James N. Glover was largely known as the "Father of Spokane" as he shaped the area bordering the falls on both sides of them into a town. The railroad, timber and rich ore from the Inland Northwest brought enormous wealth ~ making millionaires of many, although a huge fire burned most of Spokane in 1889, slowing the city's growth.

KEY PLAYERS ~ Kirtland K. Cutter, Amasa Campbell, Patsy Clark, Daniel C. Corbin, F. Rockwood Moore, James N. Glover, Louis B. Davenport, Francis Cook, Aubrey White, J.J. Browne, A.M. Cannon, J.P. Graves, William Cowles and others gave the area in general and the city in particular, its complexion. These highly successful men built grand mansions for their families and imposing downtown buildings to proclaim their wealth. Remarkably, many of these structures are still in beautiful immaculate condition.

PRESERVATION & THE TOP 10 ~ After World War II, when other cities were tearing down structures, an economic slump had folks in Spokane restoring properties. The South Hill in particular is filled with homes built in the '20s, '30s and '40s ~ many as pretty as when originally constructed.

Add to that the school system, manicured golf courses, bike trails and beautiful parks. Manito Park's Mirror Lake with its paved path around its perimeter is one of Doug and my favorite places ~ beautiful in all four seasons. Spokane's very active Spokane Preservationist Advocates (SpokanePreservation.org) respects what a jewel Spokane is and works diligently to keep it that way. Also, from the 1950s into the late 1990s, property at nearby lakes was still affordable, so many families purchased vacation lots in which to spend Spokane's hot dry Summers.

Highlight ~ Recently, AARP Magazine rated the Inland Northwest and Spokane among the top 10 regions in the U.S. for its quality of life. Many "Baby Boomers" who grew up here are coming home.

FULL CIRCLE ~ In late December 2011, Doug and I moved from the Seattle area back to Spokane.. We were both born here, although Doug grew up on Bellevue's Clyde Hill. Fond childhood memories inspired much of the artwork in this collection as the community is filled with endless inspiring subjects for an "Americana" artist like me to recreate. If you grew up here, you'll see dozens of beloved familiar settings below.

 

ENJOY THIS WINTER TOUR OF SPOKANE AND THE SURROUNDED AREA!

 

 

SEVEN GROUPS IN THE "SPOKANE" COLLECTION

I've divided this collection into seven groups with sub-categories. Each group highlights neighborhoods, communities and well-known beloved regional areas. I have painted over 250 images of the area, so the fine art shared on my website revolves with the four seasons and highlights its holidays.

NEW ARTWORK, GROUP PDFS & "THE BIG LIST"

ENJOY ~ And click on Ordering for details on purchasing any of the artwork featured here (Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express).

 

SPOKANE'S DOWNTOWN DISTRICT ~ BELOVED PRESTIGIOUS LANDMARKS PLUS "FUN" LEGENDARY CITY SETTINGS

The Entire Downtown District Collection pdf ~ Click on the three-page pdf to see and learn about all 11 images.

"FLYING SOUTH OVER SPOKANE FALLS (HUNTINGTON PARK)" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Not only did famed architect Kirtland K. Cutter create dozens of beautiful homes and handsome landmark buildings in Spokane, he also lent his design flair to other projects.

This portrayed the majestic Monroe Street Bridge, which spanned the river at the west end of downtown Spokane. In 1910, John Ralston, Spokane’s city engineer and designer of the grand bridge, invited Cutter to design its decorative handrails and lookout stations, which featured life-size reliefs of bison skulls.

The photo here showed the bridge just after its construction. In the background was another famous landmark, the Washington Water Power Post Street Substation. Cutter designed that massive brick and basaltic rock industrial building in 1909.

Recently, Huntington Park situated on the south side of the falls was given a formal restoration with the installation of lawn, a basaltic rock terraced gardens and assorted decorative plantings ~ creating a very inviting space for folks to not only view the cascading water, but stay a while and enjoy a picnic in the scenic spot.

Highlight ~ WWP’s first CEO, Frank Rockwood Moore, gave Cutter one of his first residential commissions ~ a stunning Turdor-Revival (now demolished) on the property between the D.C. Corbin House and the F. Lewis Clark House which later served as the parking lot for the restored Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens.

"MERRY MEETING AT THE FLOUR MILL" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The historic Flour Mill has served Spokane as a unique refurbished retail destination since 1974 and Spokane’s Expo 74 Environment World’s Fair. The setting featured boutique-style shops, Clinkerdagger’s Restaurant (Clinkerdagger.com), event center spaces on its grounds and interior ~ including the recent addition of an enclosed rooftop space overlooking Spokane’s Riverfront Park and the Downtown District.

Built in 1895, this was one a several mills on the Spokane River that took advantage of the power they produced in the late 1800s before F. Rockwood Moore developed Washington Water Power (later Avista).

It was initially involved in one of the most difficult, hard fought lawsuits in Spokane’s history that delayed its operation for five years.

Highlight ~ I pictured friends Tom and Kathie Kellogg’s cozy trailer in front of the flour mill, offering traditional roasted chestnuts at Christmastime on a chilly afternoon.

"THE SPOKANE COUNTY COURTHOUSE" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT / NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2014• ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

29-year-old W.A. Ritchie won the design competition sponsored by the Board of the County Commissioner in 1893 for the Spokane County Courthouse.

Construction in the French Renaissance style began in 1894 on property located across the Spokane River from Spokane’s Downtown District. It was regarded as a masterpiece with its elaborate statuesque towers, handsome masonry and intricate wrought-iron metalwork. The center tower and roof were freshened up in 2012. It has been an important part of Spokane’s skyline for over a hundred years.

A dubious honor, the courtyard held the county’s first public hanging on its grounds in 1897, executing a man who had murdered a woman.

Highlight ~ I dedicated this painting to my father, a successful Spokane attorney who spent much of his career in this building.

"DALLYING AT THE DAVENPORT" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • OCTOBER 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I gave this artwork a late 1940s time-frame, painting Louis M. Davenport's legendary hotel in the heart of Spokane’s Downtown District as it looked decades ago. To the right is the Pennington Hotel and at the forefront, Davenport’s luxurious restaurant.

Designed by famed architect, Kirtland Kelsey Cutter, the Davenport Hotel (TheDavenportHotel.com) opened in 1914 to become an iconic part on Spokane’s skyline for decades.

With Davenport’s death in 1951, his hotel was sold to the company that owned Seattle's grand Olympic Hotel, but the new owners allowed it to gradually decline and The Davenport finally closed 1985.

After years of neglect with demolition looming, Walt and Karen Worthy purchased the Vintage Davenport in 2000. Spending countless hours of renovation, restoration and careful attention to detail, they reopened the grand “lady” in 2002, giving Spokane back its remarkable local treasure. In December 2021 however, after years of a very fine presence in the Pacific Northwest, the Worthys sold their properties to the K.S.L. Corporation.

Highlight ~ I pictured my parents in this piece, arriving at the hotel for their honeymoon night at the Davenport in October 1947.

 

 

MANITO AND OTHER COUNTY & STATE PARKS AND GARDENS ~ SETTINGS WITHIN SPOKANE'S CITY LIMIITS PLUS STATE PARKS IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST ~ INCLUDING MOUNT SPOKANE

Entire Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens Collection pdf ~ Click on the five-page pdf to see and learn about all 25 paintings.

LEGENDARY MANITO PARK ~ BELOVED TEN-ACRE SOUTH HILL SETTING THAT OPENED IN 1904

NEW! "LIGHTS A-GLOW AT THE MANITO CONSERVATORY" (MANITO PARK, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2019 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10 -INCH)  

Manito Park (TheFriendsOfManito.org)was a huge part of my life growing up in Spokane.

My first 12 years as a youngster were spent in a small cottage and then a Dutch Colonial in the Manito neighborhood. The park was within walking distance. In the 1950s and 1960s, kids could take off most anytime they wanted and play safely there ~ with or without chums.

After moving back from the Seattle area, my husband and I bought a brick bungalow near Manito Park and found it to be the gift that keeps on giving. As wonderful as old memories were, we found many new ones.

A favorite has been “Holiday Lights” ~ a magical display of thousands of colored lights decorating the interior of the Gaiser Conservatory. I pictured folks I love gathering to tour with cups of steaming cocoa.

Highlight ~ Created by volunteers from the Friends of Manito, it’s open during the Holiday Season for all to enjoy ~ still at no charge when I painted this piece.

“SLEDDING ON THE SOUTH HILL” (MANITO PARK, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This piece pictured Manito Park’(TheFriendsOfManito.org), sledding hill on the corner of Grand Boulevard and 18th Avenue as it looked in the late 1950s at Manito Park on Spokane's South Hill.

I painted friends and family enjoying a crisp winter day at the park after a fresh snowfall ~ something folks in the neighborhood have done since 1904 when the beloved park was established.

In 1959, my parents gave me an aluminum “Flying Saucer” for Christmas. All of us kids had our “Flexible Flyer” sleds, but these metal discs were the latest thing! We sat down in the center, crossed our legs, grabbed the leather handles on both sides ~ and prayed we didn't hit a tree on the way down because steering was out of the question.

Highlight ~ There were two sides of the hill ~ a smaller one by the picnic area for the younger set and a larger one adjacent to the street that the bigger kids poured water on to speed up the ride. This sheet of ice guaranteed a VERY swift trip to the bottom ~ steering sleds was impossible. There was always a kid or two every season that ended up at the hospital when a tree stopped their ride!

NEW! "SNOWFALL AT THE BASALTIC ROCK BRIDGE" (MANITO PARK, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2020 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH

One of the most unique things about 90-acre Manito Park (TheFriendsOfManito.org) was the prolific use of native basaltic rock on structures throughout the grounds when this magnificent park was created in 1904.

This included rest-rooms shelters, Headhouse (the administration building on the north side of the Gaiser Conservatory), the Park Bench Cafe, storage buildings above Duncan Garden on its east side and later in the 1950s, the huge fireplace at the west end of Manito Pond.

A remarkably beautiful feature at the park was its stone bridge that connected Rose Hill to the property that originally housed zoo animals before it closed in 1932 due to the Great Depression. This decision was further spurned by an accident that maimed a child when she reached through bars to feed a polar bear.

Highlight ~ I painted this scene with Doug, me and our two granddaughters, Addison and Piper, enjoying the day after a fresh snowfall. 

"FUN & FROLIC AT THE MANITO FIREPLACE" (MANITO PARK, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2006 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

At the west end of the Manito Park’s (TheFriendsOfManito.org) Duck Pond (also known as Mirror Lake), a massive basaltic rock fireplace was built in 1955 as a memorial to Lt. Lawrence Rist, an Air Force officer who was killed in action in the Korean War.

For decades growing up in Spokane, my parents took our family ice-skating during the winter months on Manito Pond. At that time the city and local fire department took pains to keep the surface smoothly groomed for skaters.

There was nearly always a fire blazing for folks who were chilled and in need of warming up and a hot beverage. I filled this scene with family and friends enjoying the day.

Highlight ~ The Friends of Manito stewardship organization recently paved the long-time gravel pathway that bordered the pond, creating a much more user-friendly walkway for folks to enjoy in all seasons.

 

 

SPOKANE COUNTY & STATE PARKS AND GARDENS ~ SETTINGS WITHIN SPOKANE'S CITY LIMIITS PLUS INLAND NW STATE PARKS, INCLUDING MOUNT SPOKANE

"THE GOLDEN CAROUSEL" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, RIVERFRONT PARK, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTEDMARCH 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In 1909, I.D. Looff finished his stunning carouse (SpokaneCarousel.org) ~ elaborate in every detail with dozens of multi-sized mirror panels and 180 glittering lights. Too expensive for its original home at Natatorium Park at a price of $20,000, Looff struck a special deal. If the park would allow his son Louis Vogel to run the carousel and other concessions on a percentage basis, Looff would ship the carousel to the park as a wedding gift for his daughter Emma.

When Natatorium Park closed in 1968, its property developed into a mobile home park, the carousel was dismantled and stored. With the opening of Spokane’s World Fair, Expo 74 at 100-acre Riverfront Park, the most anticipated events was the re-opening of the carousel ~ not just for viewing, but for riding!

A few years ago, a bond was passed to update and make improvements to Riverfront Park. This included the construction on a new custom protective structure for the vintage merry-go-round.

Highlight ~ In late Spring 2018, Mayor Condon opened its doors and the elegant Looff Carousel began spinning again for her eager riders.

"CAVORTING AT CANNON HILL POND" (CANNON NEIGHBORHOOD, THE SOUTH HILL• PAINTED JULY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH))

Cannon Hill Park was created just west of Saint Augustine’s Parish where I attended grade school for six years. I painted a glimpse of it into the background of this piece.

There was little property for playgrounds in the 1950s-60s, so in winter, the 6th-, 7th- and 8th-graders were allowed to skate on the pond during recess. The boys played hockey and the girls twirled and skated backwards (we all dreamed of joining the “Ice Capades”).

The site of the Washington Brick & Lime Co. in the 1880s (used for many South Hill homes), when the clay deposits ran out, the Adam’s family (relatives of John Quincy Adams) donated 13 acres for Adams Park, later named for real estate developer A.M. Cannon. In 1910, the famed Olmsted brothers designed the park, including a large pond with basaltic rock bridges, two pergolas and a wading pool for children ~ no longer in place.

Highlight ~ I filled this work with family and friends ~ including the Roberts, McCarthy, Shelledy kids and more. The Shelledys lived in the blond brick two-story bungalow by the right edge of the pond.

"VISTA HOUSE VIEW" (MOUNT SPOKANE STATE PARK, WA • PAINTED FEBRUARY 2010 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This artwork portrayed the historic Vista House (MountSpokane.com) on a gorgeous sunny day with friends, family and a group of eager young S.S.R.A. ~ including my nephew Scot and niece Isabell Simpson when they were just starting out in the racing organization.

Located at the summit a short hike up from the top of the #1 chairlift, this granite stone cottage was designed by Spokane architect, Henry C. Bertelsen to blend with Mount Spokane’s stunning natural setting.

It was built in 1933 during the Great Depression with help from the C.C.C. (the Civilian Conservation Corps), headquartered at Riverside State Park on Spokane’s North Side.

Renovated in 2002 under the direction of Mount Spokane State Park, it re-opened to skiers on Sundays and holidays, offering refreshments and a huge, friendly fireplace.

Highlight ~ During warmer Spring and Summer months, the Vista House has opened its doors to host weddings and other special celebrations. Although the rustic Vista House has its special charm, the view from the property is truly "the star" of these events when the sun is shining and the sky is clear.

"ICE RIBBON AT RIVERFRONT PARK" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2019 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In early December 2017, Spokane opened the first ice ribbon on the West Coast ~ a fun addition to Riverfront Park which was part of the updating plans happening on what was once the site of Spokane’s Expo 74 environmental fair.

The ice ribbon promised a wonderful urban experience with its 16-foot wide 700-foot trail curling around the west end of the park. Fire pits, an ice lounge and more promised a great experience for skaters young and old. Summer offered roller-skating instead and other activities, so the ribbon could be enjoyed year round.

Highlight ~ I filled this artwork with skaters enjoying the crisp winter day and pictured Riverfront’s pavilion and iconic clock tower in the background of this piece honoring the ice ribbon’s opening day.

 

BROWNE'S ADDITION ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, "HOME SWEET HOMES" AND THE MAC'S RESTORED AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE

Entire Browne's Addition Collection pdf ~ Click on the seven-page pdf to see and learn about all 32 images (16 Browne's Addition settings and 16 of the Campbell House).

BROWNE'S ADDITION SMALL BUSINESSES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ SPOKANE'S FIRST AND OLDEST NEIGHBORHOOD

NEW! "PINK PALACE ON PACIFIC (AVENUE)" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2021 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I have painted very few pink residences, as this color home is not easy to find in Spokane, Washington. Frequently, Spokane’s vintage grand houses were Tudor-Revival, Federal, Colonial or Prairie-style and constructed of durable materials like basaltic rock, brick, granite or stucco.

In Port Townsend, Snohomish and Walla Walla ~ communities known for their historic Carpenters’ Gothic Victorians, visitors stand a better chance of finding mansions painted pink.

But, lucky me. I discovered this inviting pink “palace” on Pacific Avenue in Browne‘s Addition near Coeur d’Alene Park. No doubt constructed many decades ago, little was available on its history. It may have been a single-family dwelling that was converted into an apartment house after World War II when the city encouraged this practice to accommodate returning servicemen in need of homes in which to start their families.

Highlight ~ I gave this artwork a gardening theme with my husband Doug and me planting pink impatiens and hydrangeas in the front flower beds.

"BRUNCH AT BROWNE'S BISTRO" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED APRIL 2020 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome two-story-plus structure named for early Spokane developer J.J. Browne, was built in 1901at 1924 Pacific Avenue, south of the historic E.J. Roberts Mansion.

Charming and eclectic inside and out, the dining room served patrons on the main floor and the second floor bar overlooked the Elk Public House, once a drug store famous for its soda fountain like the one featured in the Holiday film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.”  

I learned that the Browne’s Bistro owners Jim and Terri Adolfson (pictured on the front porch) had once been proprietors of Fergusson’s Cafe next door to the Garland Milk Bottle. When Doug and I visited the place for breakfast in early Autumn 2019, the bistro had been open a few months and had just received a very favorable review in a recent issue of The Inlander. It was mobbed with eager customers.

Highlight ~ Another time, lunching on the patio with my mother and sister, Peggy made a quick trip inside, returning to share that the dining room was decorated with framed prints of my paintings. I met the Adolfsons that day and the inspiration for this piece was born.

"THE PHELPS HOUSE IN THE FALL" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2005 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome brick and basaltic rock Colonial Revival-style home was built in Spokane’s Browne’s Addition in the late 1800s across the street from Coeur d'Alene Park, it was thought by D.B. Fotheringham. The Moses A. Phelps family lived there from 1886 well into the mid-1950s.

On his journey to Seattle, Phelps arrived in Spokane Falls and was enchanted by its beauty.

He decided to stay in the community by the falls and opened the very successful M.A. Phelps Lumber Company, supplying timber for the construction of both the massive Spokane County Court House and the Division Street Bridge.

Highlight ~ My dear friend Mary Doohan suggested this home for a painting when it was owned by a chum of hers. I painted Mary and me bringing steaming pumpkin pies to this merry group of al fresco diners.

"AUTUMN AFTERNOON AT PATSY CLARK'S" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)


The Patrick Clark Mansion across from the Coeur d’Alene Park on 2nd Avenue and Hemlock Street was the fine work of architect Kirtland Kelsey Cutter. The flamboyant design of this three-story residence was inspired by the palaces of Islamic Spain. Constructed beige-gold brick with a crimson tile roof, it stood out dramatically in a neighborhood of Tudor-Revivals and Queen Anne Victorians.

Born in Ireland of poor parents, 20-year old Patrick Clark arrived in the United States in 1870 and chose mining for his career path. He worked in several states before joining a Spokane syndicate, partnering with high-profile businessmen Finch, Campbell, Wakefield and Corbin.

He moved his family into this opulent mansion in 1897 after living temporarily in the Fotheringham House across the street directly east. For a time in the 1980s and 1990s, the residence was a very popular fine restaurant named after him.

Later on in the 2000s, the grand mansion was purchased by a group of successful attorneys who installed their offices on the second floor. A further renovation and restoration was completed, making the first floor a sought after event center for weddings and other social functions. These attorneys just sold the landmark structure to another group of lawyers.

Highlight ~ When Doug and I were courting in 1997, I brought him to Spokane to meet my mother Sally. We chose Patsy Clark's when it was serving Spokane as a fine dining establishment as our restaurant for that special introductory dinner. This piece featured my brother Bill and his wife Jorja preparing for an the Autumn feast of Thanksgiving.

 

 

THE MAC'S AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE ~ GRACIOUS LIVING FOR THE CAMPBELLS AND THE STAFF WHO LOOKED AFTER THEM IN THE LATE 1800S AND EARLY 1900S

"DELIGHTFUL DINING AT THE CAMPBELL HOUSE" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This painting was created to celebrate the Amasa Campbell House’s (NorthwestMuseum.org) formal dining room.

The large room was roomy enough for large dinner parties ~ 20 by 25 feet ~ and featured an expansive table seating up to twelve, a grand buffet, a fireplace of Delft-style tiles and six large windows overlooking the grounds in the back of the home. This was the scene of many elegant dinner parties, although it served the small family of three as well (Amasa, wife Grace and daughter Helen).

To the right of the fireplace was the door to the butler’s pantry, which opened on to the kitchen for serving. This closet-sized room was where the china, crystal, silver and table linens were stored.

I gave this artwork a Valentine’s Day dinner party theme with delicate heart streamers intertwined with the chandelier and fresh pink tulips and carnations as the floral centerpiece  ~ a welcome holiday during Spokane’s long dark winters.

Highlight ~ When the family required a servant to attend to their needs, they discretely pushed a small button located beneath the tabletop.NEW!

NEW! "TULIPS, TEDDY BEARS AND TWIN BEDS" (CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, THE MAC, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 5X7-INCH)

I took a bit of poetic license with this guest room next to the Campbell’s Linen room. It was devoid of wallpaper and other accoutrements when I took photos of it over a decade ago when I began work on my Campbell House (NorthwestMuseum.org) collection.

Regardless, the room’s two matching twin-size “posters” were charming and delightful ~ perhaps making it the perfect guest room for visiting youngsters.

In addition to our kittiewinks Andy and Sophie, I included a huge container of multi-colored tulips marching across the fireplace mantle.

I also tucked two friendly teddy bears into this scene as in 1902, famed Richard Steiff introduced his iconic stuff teddy bears (named for President Theodore Roosevelt) ~ roughly the same time that the Campbells were beginning life in their recently completed home in Browne’s Addition, Spokane’s first and oldest residential neighborhood.

NEW! "AMASA CAMPBELL'S MEN'S CARD ROOM" (THE CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 5X7-INCH)

Located in the basement of the Campbell’s gorgeous Tudor Revival mansion (NorthwestMuseum.org), this unique room was where Amasa Campbell entertained his male (only) guests with cigars and card games ~ usually after a sumptuous dinner party.

It should be noted that Amasa and his wife Grace truly loved to entertain, purchasing a very large dining room table to accommodate visiting friends. Their guest lists frequently included neighbors / business associates Patsy Clark, John Finch and W.J.C. Wakefield and their wives.

As these and others were usually quite wealthy, stakes were frequently very high in card games. Decorating treatments included stenciled walls and ceilings, carved woodwork, matching doors and more.

Highlight ~ This lower level space also included a small room off the main one that held a huge safe.

"COOKIES IN THE KITCHEN" (THE CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JUNE 2011 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The red and white kitchen with its white octagonal tile floor must have been a hub of activity when the Campbell family lived in their grand residence (NorthwestMuseum.org).

It was conveniently located across the hall from the servants’ dining room on one side and next to the butler’s pantry, which served the formal dining room on the other. All of the meals for the Campbell family as well as the staff of servants were prepared here.

The focal point was the huge, ornate Majestic wood stove with ovens for baking, roasting and keeping things warm and a cook-top large enough to accommodate several skillets and saucepans at the same time. To the left of the range was a large walk-in pantry equipped with a glass-windowed oak ice-box storage unit.

Highlight ~ During past Holiday Open Houses, this space was open for guests to explore ~ including the rarely seen butler’s pantry ~ all while munching on a freshly baked warn cookies!

 

THE PRESTIGIOUS SOUTH HILL ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS ~ CANNON HILL / MANITO / CABLE ADDITIONS, CLIFF PARK, HIGH DRIVE, LOWER SOUTH HILL, MORAN PRIARIE, ROCKWOOD, OVERBLUFF, SOUTH PERRY DISTRICT AND MORE

Entire South Hill Collection pdf ~ Click on the 17-page pdf to see and learn about all 83 images.

THE SOUTH HILL'S PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES ~ ICONIC CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED SMALL BUSINESSES

NEW! "MERRY CAROLERS AT SAINT MARK'S" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Winter at Saint Mark’s (StMarks-Spokane.org)! This remarkable structure was built on the corner of Grand Boulevard and 24th Avenue on Spokane’s South Hill in 1950 near Manito Park.

Architects Funk, Molander and Johnson designed this Mid-Century Modern church ~ giving it a distinct Swedish-style influence. Unique for its time were its A-frame lines and needle-shaped bell-tower embellished with four angels.

It was modern inside as well. ~ Acclaimed Spokane artist Harold Balazs created the interior art and sculpture as part of the church’s unique design. This neighborhood Lutheran church made quite a remarkable statement for it’s time ~ considered to be a fine example of Mid-Century Modern architecture in Spokane. The property was particularly pretty during the Holidays ~ especially with fresh snow covering the ground. I pictured a diverse group of merry carolers in the foreground in front of its signature basaltic rock wall welcoming folks to the Christmas Eve Service.

Highlight ~ In 1955 when I was about to start kindergarten, Saint Augustine’s parish had not implemented this program into their curriculum yet, so some neighborhood moms suggested Saint Mark's. My mother Sally enrolled me there. I just LOVED kindergarten, as we kids were constantly creating art projects with crayons, pastels, clay, plaster of Paris, finger-paints and more ~ shades of things to come for me!

"SNOWFALL AT SAINT AUGUSTINE'S" (SAINT AUGUSTINE'S PARISH, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When I grew up in Spokane, my first twelve years were spent at Saint Augustine’s (StAugustineSpokane.CatholicWeb.com) parish where our family attended Mass and grade school on Spokane’s South Hill. The school building functioned as the church for decades, but in the 1940s, Father (later Monsignor) Stephen P. Buckley drove the fund-raising for a new church.

Designed by the John W. Maloney architects, Walter G. Meyers & Son contractors built the church. They used brick veneer and Indiana limestone for the exterior with a cornerstone of red carnelian granite from Minnesota. Bishop Charles C. White dedicated the new church on October 1, 1950.

Later Father Buckley had landscaped terraced gardens added to honor the Seven Sorrows of Mary ~ creating a lyrical beautiful setting. The statues were later moved to the perimeter of the gardens by the parking lot after being vandalized in the 1980s by a group of malicious teenagers. I completed this piece to commemorate the 100th birthday of the parish.

Highlight ~ Monsignor Buckley left Saint Augustine’s in 1968 and years later my husband and I purchased the cottage where he spent his retirement years. This was the view from the front porch. I pictured my sisters and our sweethearts caroling by the street corner Nativity scene.

"WINTER CAMPUS AT LEWIS & CLARK (HIGH SCHOOL)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This lower South Hill setting on Fourth Avenue was home to three prominent schools. Spokane Central School was founded in 1883 as a two-story, four-room schoolhouse. Eight years later, an elaborately beautiful Victorian brick building was constructed there as South Central High School. Tragically, fire gutted the structure, leaving only its shell.

$500,000 was raised, acclaimed L.L. Rand was chosen as the architect, and students traveled across town to North Central High School while the European Gothic-style building was under construction.

North Central’s Principal Richard Hargreaves won a contest sponsored by The Spokane Chronicle with the name “Lewis & Clark” for the High School. President Theodore Roosevelt laid its cornerstone in 1911. I created this piece with a post-WW II time period and gave it a winter theme.

Highlight ~ I dedicated it to my father Joe Simpson who loyally attended many L.C. class reunions until his death in 1987.

"SOUTH HILL SNOWMEN (ROCKWOOD BAKERY)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This artwork pictured three snowmen welcomed patrons to this beloved bakery a half block east of Grand Boulevard and Manito Park on Spokane’s South Hill.

Whether the weather was chill as in this scene, or warm for al fresco dining on the deck of the historic 18th Avenue setting, the Rockwood Bakery has always been a favorite of loyal patrons.

For those with a sweet tooth and discerning love of rich coffee and flavorful tea, from the day that the Rockwood opened, people have gathered there.

When my sister’s fiancé was working on the hardwood floors in our nearby bungalow, he breakfasted every morning here.

Highlight ~ In the early 1900s, this structure served the neighborhood as the Rockwood Market. It was the first to offer its customers meat lockers to freeze their large quantity purchases ~ perfect during hunting season.

 

 

SOUTH HILL "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ BUNGALOWS, CAPE CODS, DUTCH COLONIALS, FOURSQUARES, TUDORS, VICTORIANS AND MORE

NEW! “SNOWY FUN AT THE HISTORIC FOLSOM HOUSE” (MANITO / ROCKWOOD, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome three-story Tudor-Revival mansion was built at the top of a steep hillside with its grounds in the back overlooking prestigious Rockwood Boulevard and neighborhood below.

The back lawn bordered with old growth trees has always welcomed woodland creatures that continually delighted the two children pictured here.

Originally designed for Myron and Maud Folsom in 1910 by architect W.W. Hyslop, this remarkable residence has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In the foreground, I painted the family who lived here when I finished this art sharing an activity they loved ~ creating friendly snowmen.

Highlight ~ Note the three squirrels and two fawns scattered about this piece keeping the family company on this beautiful Winter evening.

"SHIMMERING SNOWFALL ON CANNON HILL (HAWLEY HOUSE)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 11x14-INCH)

Designed by Whitehouse and Price, this pristine Colonial Revival-style clinker brick residence was built on the corner of Stevens and Shoshone in 1926 overlooking Cannon Hill Pond. History suggests that Hawley owned an oil company and he had this home created for his family.

A later noteworthy resident was Dr. Harcus of Harcus & Aspray Radiologists, Spokane’s first large practice.

In December 2016, Molly Meyers Jakubczak purchased the original painting and prints as Christmas gifts for each of her kids who had grown there. She had just finished an extensive “face-lift” of the home, with plans to list it for sale in Spring 2017 after 30 years in the brick beauty. In 2018, a new family with young children purchased the place and began creating memories of their own.

The new family also has a large canvas reproduction of this artwork. I gave this piece a skating theme as Spokane always enjoyed four seasons. In Winter, Cannon Hill pond frequently froze, beaconing folks of all ages to spend the day on the ice. Girls twirled and did their best to skate backwards without losing their balance while boys engaged in some very spirited hockey matches.

Highlight ~ In the 1950-60s, older students from nearby Saint Augustine’s School spent lunch hours on the ice as there was a shortage of playground in those days.

"9TH AVENUE ~ ICE SKATERS' BALL (COMSTOCK-SHADLE HOUSE)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Spokane has always been a sports lovers’ playground during the snowy Winter months.

Skiing, sledding and ice-skating topped the list. Several city ponds and nearby lakes scattered throughout Spokane County froze over whenever the temperatures dropped into the teens, some with huge stone outdoor fireplaces for the extra hardy merrymakers ~ thus the “Ice Skater Ball” theme.

I pictured my husband and me on the frosty front walkway flanked by a friendly snowman with ice skates dangling from his arms. Note the frozen pond and blazing fire on the property behind the mansion.

Highlight ~ This handsome Tudor-Revival home was one of four similar Comstock-Shadle family houses on 9th Avenue. Acclaimed architect Willis A. Ritchie, who also designed the Spokane County Courthouse, created the plans for this two and a half story mansion built in 1910 for James and Elizabeth Comstock.

"SNOW COVERED CRAFTSMAN" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS ~ 8X 10-INCH)

This artwork was a creative reworking of a detail of the “Fine Fall Finish” large “neighborhood” painting (two other houses plus this one) I completed several years ago.

The first painting had an Autumn theme, but here, I’ve converted the season to Winter ~ adding twinkling stars in the early evening sky and a dusting of snow on the vintage restored 1937 Craftsman.

Friendly neighbors with youngsters perched on shoulders or seated on “Flexible Flyers” had stopped by for a quick “hello” on their way to Manito Park’s coasting hills off Grand Boulevard ~ a particularly treacherous icy slope for older kids with a gentler one for youngsters.

There was still an hour or two of magical fun to be shared by all in this late afternoon Winter scene.

Highlight ~ My husband and I owned this pretty cottage for twenty years, meticulously restoring it inch by inch over the first ten we were there.

 

 

 

THE HISTORIC NORTH SIDE ~ SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA COLLECTION, CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN CORBIN PARK, GARLAND, INDIAN TRAIL, LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER, LOGAN, NETTLETON, WEST POINT ROAD, THE UNIVERSITY DISTRICT AND MORE

The Entire North Side Collection pdf ~ Click on the seven-page pdf to see and learn about all 31 images.

NORTH SIDE'S SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA COLLECTION ~ FATHER JOSEPH CATALDO S.J.'S RENOWNED CHRISTIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM IN SPOKANE

"THE HISTORIC HUETTER HOUSE" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • MAY 2007• ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

John Huetter started work on this stately mansion in 1889. In the construction business ~ and a fine stone mason and brick layer ~ he was also responsible for Gonzaga University’s DeSmet Hall and the Administration Building (College Hall).

The great fire of 1889 provided other opportunities, such as the construction of the original St. Joseph’s Orphanage. Huetter’s family of nine children were active in St. Aloysius parish.

Several Catholic organizations used this house until 1956 when Bishop Bernard J. Topel dedicated it to the memory of Bishop Charles D. White (second bishop of the Spokane Diocese) and commissioned it as a Preparatory Seminary.

This painting was completed to honor its 50th year of preparing men for the priesthood.

When a new seminary was built, a decision made to move the historic structure to its location near Bing Crosby’s residence where it began serving Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.Edu) as the alumni center.

Highlight ~ I pictured my brothers John, Bill and Bob Simpson as young altar boys at Christmastime in the foreground of this piece.

"BING CROSBY CRAFTSMAN" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • JUNE 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Bing Crosby's craftsman (Gonzaga.Edu) was home to Hollywood’s most famous crooner Bing Crosby and one of Hollywood's most memorable actors during his years of growing up on Spokane’s North Side ~ although Harry L. Crosby was born in Tacoma, Washington.

Located adjacent to Gonzaga University campus, Crosby was a huge booster of the college during his lifetime and did a great deal for the university, including fundraising and donating the famous Crosby Library.

Although Bing never finished earning his degree at Gonzaga, in later years he was awarded a special honorary degree, an especially meaningful occasion for him.For many years, Crosby's craftsman served as the home for the Gonzaga Alumni Association, which later moved to the Huetter House across Boone Avenue from this house.

Highlight ~ My father met Bing Crosby when the actor was in town and came to listen to the band my dad was playing in during his college years.

"CLASSMATES AT COLLEGE HALL" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • JUNE 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.Edu) owes its beginning to Italian-born missionary Fr. Joseph Cataldo, S.J. Often in poor health, he was a dynamo nonetheless and was appointed General Superior of the Rocky Mountain Mission in 1877 (8 residences and 38 members scattered throughout the Northwest).

Competition with Protestants for access to local Native American tribes was the main reason for founding a Jesuit college in Spokane. When it opened, applicants had to “know how to read and write, and not be under ten years of age.” Originally only white students were permitted to enroll.

Railroad land was purchased in 1881. Gonzaga began educating in 1887, and was incorporated and able to grant degrees by 1896. A permanent residence and four-story building was completed by 1899. Handsome, stately “College Hall” became the key building on the beautiful campus.

Highlight ~ The hall’s entrance was further enhanced in April 2008 by the dedication of George Carlson’s Saint Ignatius statue, a reflection pool and new landscaping.

"GATHERING AT GONZAGA PREP" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED March 2017 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 9X12-INCH)

Gonzaga Prep (GPrep.com) was established in 1887 by Father Joseph Cataldo and S.J. with eight other faculty members. It became one of four Jesuit High Schools in the Pacific Northwest acclaimed for “preparing students for life.”

Once known as Gonzaga High, from early years it had a solid relationship with Gonzaga University. Gonzaga High was located within the college at one setting or another wherever the institution moved ~ and some years, the tuition from its considerable student body helped keep the college afloat.

The high school split from the college administratively in 1926, but the permanent move to Euclid Avenue did not occur until 1954 after Father Gordon Toner, S.J. purchased 85 lots that ultimately comprised the campus. Ground was broken in 1953 and a year later, Gonzaga Preparatory School, Inc. began teaching its 610 male students. In 1975 with the close of Holy Names Academy (Marycliff High School followed in 1979), Gonzaga Prep opened its doors to women.

Also history making, in the late 1980s, Gonzaga Prep became the first Jesuit school in the United States to hire a lay president. When I painted this artwork, John Traynor’s longtime successor Al Falkner was completing his 43rd and final year of service with plans to retire at the end of the 2016-2017 school year.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S PUBLIC PLACES ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED BUSINESSES, INCLUDING THE SPOKANE COUNTY COURTHOUSE

"SNOW CHAPEL AT HOLY NAMES" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2012 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was the second portrait of my Holy Names Academy high school building painted 15 years after the first, “Celebrating Spring at HNA.” This work was completed in honor of the arrival of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary’s to the Pacific Northwest 125 years ago.

I pictured my classmates and younger sisters working on a chapel made of snow and twigs on the front campus grounds while our teachers looked on. The Victorian red brick building functioned as a “normal school” (teachers’ college) before it became a private school for girls.

Located a few blocks from Gonzaga University, HNA closed its doors in 1975 and the empty building sank into sad disrepair. In 1987, it was developed into “The Academy,” a non-denominational full-scale community for retired persons by local developer Harry A. Green. A few years ago, it was purchased by a company in Salt Lake City, Utah who took over running the retirement community in addition to committing to doing further restoration work on this Victorian beaut.y

Highlight ~ it was featured for a few minutes in the movie starring Johnny Depp, “Benny & Joon.”

"GATHERING AT THE GARLAND MILK BOTTLE" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2016 4 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

 This piece pictured Paul E. Newman’s Benewah Creamery’s Milk Bottle building on Garland Avenue, the first of two in Spokane (this one constructed in 1934) of the six planned by Whitehouse and Price (Hutton Settlement and more).

At a hefty price tag of $3,700 each, the Great Depression probably was the culprit in only allowing for two. The milk bottle buildings were classic examples of “literalist” architecture as they advertised in a very real way exactly what they were selling.

After decades of serving the community, the Benewah Creamery closed in 1978 and the milk bottle when on to house a variety of small businesses.

When I painted this portrait, it was a diner that served the Garland District as Mary Lou’s Milk Bottle. I painted students from North Side high schools ~ Rogers, Gonzaga Prep, North Central, Holy Names Academy and Shadle ~ in their school colors gathering for ice cream treats.

Highlight ~ In 2011, fire nearly destroyed the milk bottle and adjacent Fergusson’s Café, but after a year of rebuilding, the beloved historic icon reopened for business.

"NOVEMBER AT OLD NORTH CENTRAL HIGH" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Until 1907, students only had Spokane High School (renamed South Central High) on Fourth & Howard to educate them. In 1908, North Central High School opened with only half a wing and a dozen classrooms for its 200 students. Eventually the other wing was added plus the gymnasium.

In 2010, Central Spokane High burned to the ground, so its students joined the N.C. student body while a replacement was built. A contest sponsored by the Spokane Chronicle to name the South Hill school was won by N.C.’s Principal Richard Hargreaves who came up with “Lewis & Clark.”

Important early guests to North Central included orator William Jennings Bryant and ex-slave Booker T. Washington.

I gave this piece 1968 timeframe, picturing the “N.C. Indians” banner, cheerleaders, a football player, majorette, “Key Club” member, a female athlete in a letter sweater, ASB President Dave Westfall, Sue Saling (Betts) who was a huge help in researching this piece.

Highlight ~ During Spokane’s Expo 74, over 10,000 alumni gathered from around the world at the Spokane Coliseum for a mammoth all-class reunion. This handsome building was demolished in 1978 to make way for a modern structure.

FLOWERFIELD IN THE FALL (SAINT GEORGE'S SCHOOL)" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JUNE 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Located on the banks of the Little Spokane River on Spokane’s North Side, Flowerfield was once the 440-acre Summer estate of Louis Davenport, his wife and son.

Davenport had once commissioned Kirtland Cutter to design and construct a huge mansion in the Rockwood neighborhood on the South Hill, but was forced to sell it prematurely after only two years to the Porter family due to investors' demands for early repayment for his grand Davenport Hotel. He relocated his wife and child into a sumptuous suite at his Davenport Hotel. This Summer home must have been a welcome countryside escape from Spokane's busy city life in Summer.

Highlight ~ The property was sold in 1955 and 120 acres of it became Saint George’s School (sgs.org), one of the finest private schools in Eastern Washington. The Davenport’s lovely two-story residence was preserved as part of Saint George's campus, and went on to serve as an event center.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ BUNGALOWS, DUTCH COLONIALS, FOURSQUARES, SALT BOXES, VICTORIANS AND MORE

"NORTH SIDE NOEL" ( THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1987 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was a portrait of the classic Queen Anne-style home that my father grew up in just before the Great Depression hit Spokane in the late 1920s.

Life had been very prosperous for the Simpson family and they not only owned this beautiful home, but another that added to the family’s revenue as a rental.

Pictured in front of the three-story Victorian were my dad Joseph and his little sister Wanda, about to take their “Flexible Flyer” sled out for a ride. Sadly, the Depression spelled disaster for this family as it did for so many others. The Simpsons experienced hard times and lost all their properties to foreclosure ~ an all too common fate in the tragic time.

A highway was constructed through the property decades later, so this pretty Victorian was demolished in that process. Luckily my grandmother Jessie Simpson kept several photographs of it, which made this portrait possible.

Highlight ~ I gave prints of the finished painting to my dad and aunt for Christmas in 1987, which was fortuitous as a few short month later, my father passed away.

"CHRISTMAS QUEEN ANNE (DETAIL)" (LOGAN NEIGHBORHOOD, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1995 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was the second portrait that I painted of the Joe Doohan home for the family when they were living in the North Side neighborhood during the early years of their marriage. The first painting was done with a Halloween trick-or-treating theme and you'll often find it featured on my Autumn web site.

This Victorian was located a few short blocks north of Gonzaga University. The charming two-story with its "witches hat" roofline was in pretty disastrous shape due to several different households of students who had abused the structure during their tenure of renting it. It reminded me of the house in “It’s a Wonderful Life," as when I first saw this house, it was similar to the one featured in Frank Capra's classic Holiday film starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed.

Joe and Mary painstakingly transformed it with months of scraping, painting, refinishing and updating. Charmingly detailed both inside and out, this home created many happy memories for the very young Doohan family when the couple was starting their family.

Highlight ~ Mary Doohan sponsored and helped me for years at the Spokane Club's Holiday Artisan Fair in the early 2000s, so I painted this portrait of their home and gave her the original artwork. The couple used this as Christmas card art in 1995.

"THE OLD MAXWELL-PETTET PLACE" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This snowy scene portrayed the old Maxwell-Pettet place located on picturesque West Point Road. This sprawling North Side residence was reputed to be the oldest home in Spokane, according to community public records.

The original small cottage was built by the Pettet family who sold it a short time later to the Maxwells ~ which is how the home got its name. The Maxwells lived in this residence for several decades.

Eventually, the property was sold to the Powell family. Over the years, the original wood cottage was encased and added on to, resulting in this remarkably pretty rambling cottage in the woods on cliffs overlooking the Spokane River and old Fort George Wright.

Highlight ~ William Powell married Helen Campbell, the only daughter of Amasa and Grace who raised their daughter in the historic Tudor Revival Campbell House, part of the MAC (Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture).

"BING CROSBY'S CRAFTSMAN" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • JULY 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

(Also featured above in the "North Side Saint Aloysius Gonzaga Collection" section) Bing Crosby's craftsman was home to Hollywood’s most famous crooner Bing Crosby and one of Hollywood's most memorable actors during his years of growing up on Spokane’s North Side ~ although Harry L. Crosby was born in Tacoma, Washington.

Located adjacent to Gonzaga University campus, Crosby was a huge booster of the college during his lifetime and did a great deal for the university, including fundraising and donating the famous Crosby Library.

Although Bing never finished earning his degree at Gonzaga, in later years he was awarded a special honorary degree, an especially meaningful occasion for him.For many years, Crosby's craftsman served as the home for the Gonzaga Alumni Association, which later moved to the Huetter House across Boone Avenue from this house.

Highlight ~My father met Bing Crosby when the actor was in town and came to listen to the band my dad was playing in during his college years.

 

 

THE SPOKANE VALLEY ~ PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, INCLUDING ARBOR CREST CELLLARS, AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS ~ FRUIT HILL ROAD, KOKOMO, MILLWOOD, NORTHWOOD, UNIVERSITY AND MORE

The Entire Spokane Valley Collection pdf ~ Click on the five-page pdf to see and learn about all 17 images

"KRIS KRINGLE COMES TO THE CLIFF HOUSE (ARBOR CREST CELLARS)" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I painted this Winter portrait of the Cliff House at Arbor Crest Cellars to honor a special tradition that occurred in the early 2000s in the Spokane Valley.

An avid aviator who flew his small plane out of Felts Field decorated it for several years to look like Santa In his sleigh. On Christmas Eve (weather permitting) he would take off and criss-cross the skies above the neighborhoods in the Valley for about 15 minutes. Folks of all ages came out into their streets to watch and wave to Saint Nicholas as he made his annual visit late in the evening. It was magical ~ thus the theme for this piece.

Royal Newton Riblet built his Florentine-style Cliff House Mansion to take advantage of the stunning view from his property’s perch overlooking the Spokane River. The grounds included a waterfall that continually recycled from bottom to top, a tram that went down his cliff to the river below, a life-size chess game and other marvels. When I completed this piece, the MIlke family owned the estate, home of Arbor Crest Cellars. 

The property with its three-story mansion, basaltic rock out-buildings and marvelous gardens later became the headquarters of Arbor Crest Cellars (ArborCrest.com). This festive fine art was created to promote the 2018 Cliff House Estate Holiday Art Show.

Highlight ~ When Royal Riblet was living there, the cement factory far below on the riverside spewed harmful dust into the air, deteriorating his mansion’s facade. He sued ~ and the attorneys who won the first ever case of its kind were associates James Winton and my father Joseph A. Simpson.

"FLEXIBLE FLYERS IN THE VALLEY (MORAN-HENRY HOUSE)" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This Spokane Valley white brick Colonial home was built in 1940 for the Henry family on Boone Avenue on a large, gently sloping lot. Interestingly, its design was slightly asymmetrical as the left side of it was larger in width than the right.

In 1957, Joe and Rita Moran purchased the residence where they would raise their family of five children (L-R Georgia, Curt, Joey, Kathy and Marty) for nearly 20 years.

The property included an orchard to the left, an outdoor “living room” with white wrought iron furniture beneath the giant willow (note the lovely statue of the Blessed Mother) and a swimming pool behind the house ~ the setting for many warm weather gatherings with family and friends.

I gave this artwork a mid-1960s Winter theme, picturing the kids ready to enjoy the frosty afternoon sledding down the slope in front of the house.

Highlight ~ The folks who bought this home were advised by their realtor to strip the paint from the bricks for a more natural look, resulting in a hodgepodge of different colored sections as the residence was always meant to be painted white.

"MILLWOOD COTTAGE ON MARGUERITE" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED MAY 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This is the fifth and final alteration to a painting I completed years ago picturing my youngest sister Peggy’s family home in the Spokane Valley. After spending a decade or so living on the outskirts of San Francisco area and then Honolulu, Hawaii, they moved back to Spokane, Washington so that Jeff could take over his family’s automobile business.

Peggy and Jeff had this home built on a lot overlooking Millwood and they enjoyed a stupendous view of the Spokane Valley below. Their first child arrived on the scene soon thereafter. This portrait pictured the entire family as it was in 2014.

I swithered about whether or not to add the menagerie of pets they owned over the years, but finally decided not to as there were SO many dogs, cats and other creatures that they would have outnumbered the family!

Pictured (L-R) Mikaila (son Michael’s new wife), Kelly, Jeff, Peggy, Brooklynn and Mark. As the family grew, I altered the piece to include new additions. I gave this final edition of this painting to Peggy when she celebrated her milestone 60th birthday.

Highlight ~ When Peggy and Jeff lived on Oahu, she fell in love with the islands as the lifestyle fit her like a glove. It was a huge adjustment for her to make the move back to Spokane, so as a nod to her happy island days, she had a bird of paradise stained glass window fitted into her front door.

"CHRISTMAS IN KOKOMO" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1987• ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Doohans were in every way part of our Simpson family once we moved to the Kokomo suburban development in the early 1960s east of Spokane, Washington.

When Mike was employed by Boise-Cascade in the 1960s and sent to Spokane, he and his wife Winnie knew they wanted to stay. Meeting my parents and becoming members of their Catholic parish, a lifelong friendship began Mike purchased a local company that made sportswear, K & L Manufacturing which ultimately employed all of my sisters and brothers with part-time summer jobs during college.

My lawyer father Joe handled the company’s legal matters. The four Doohan kids Joe, Earl, Maura and Megan grew up with us and spent so much time at our Hayden Lake cabin that folks thought the place was theirs. Later on after my dad passed away,

Mike gave me away at the wedding when Doug and I were married in 2000. Winnie was my mother’s best friend and we all mourned her loss in 2000 when cancer took her ~ coincidentally on my birthday. I completed this piece as a special Christmas gift in 1987 to thank the Doohans for all the wonderful years of friendship.

Highlight ~ Mary Doohan, wife of oldest son Joe, has been a huge supporter and wonderful help to me over the years with her very kind patronage, research assistance and more.

 

 

GREATER INLAND NORTHWEST AND NORTH IDAHO ~ PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, SMALL BUSINESSES, WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY., AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN LATAH CREEK VALLEY , PEND O'REILlLE RIVER, NEWMAN LAKE, AND IDAHO'S COEUR D'ALENE, HAYDEN, SANDPOINT, AND MORE

The Entire Greater Inland NW/North Idaho Collection pdf ~ Click on the four-page pdf to see and learn about all 19 paintings.

"SEPTEMBER CELEBRATION AT SETTLERS CREEK" (COEUR D'ALENE, IDAHO • DECEMBER 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 5X7-INCH)

I painted this portrait of the rural special event destination that my niece Kelly and her fiancé David chose for their early September wedding.

Located just a short drive west of downtown Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, the sprawling hillside farm had a picturesque hilltop gazebo, large barn and several other out-buildings including this charming little cottage surrounded by several willow trees. The couple’s ceremony took place beneath the prettiest one.

Hors d’oeuvres and wedding toasts looked out over the pastoral scene from a hilltop gazebo and a grassy plateau served as the dining room for their formal al-fresco dinner.

Pictured in this piece were newlyweds, Mr. and Mrs. David Barker with beautiful bride Kelly’s new lovely step-daughters Danielle and Sophia ~ darling in their sweet periwinkle blue wedding frocks.

Highlight ~ Mother Nature cooperated beautifully for the celebration without one drop of rain!

OREVER AT THE DELTA DELTA DELTA HOUSE" (WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY, PULLMAN, WASHINGTON • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2002 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The National Chapter of the Delta Delta Delta Sorority began at Boston University in Massachusetts on the eve of Thanksgiving in 1888.

On December 14th, 1918 Delta Delta Delta opened its doors at Washington State University (WSU.edu) in Pullman, Washington to become one of the prettiest, most popular houses in the Greek system at that university.

Allison Orrico, a student there (and daughter of good friends, the Mark and Janis Orrico), suggested the handsome three-story Colonial mansion as a subject to honor with a portrait.

The result was this painting celebrating Spring, sisterhood, lifelong friendships and graduation from W.S.U.

Highlight ~ The painting I completed pictured many of Allison’s sorority sisters in the foreground in front of their beautiful Delta Delta Delta House, honoring their four years of sisterhood together.

"MAPLE TREE FARM" (HANGMAN VALLEY • DECEMBER 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Arpin Family (L-R Lori and Greg with daughters Sarah and Megan) pictured in this home portrait, founded their beloved home in Hangman Valley in 1992. Architect McKie Wing Roth (Maine) and builder Gene Plett created this authentic reproduction of an 18th Century New England farm where the family lived for 28 years.

Joining them was Golden Retriever Grace, kitties Milly and Lilly, and a flock of buff-colored hens ruled by rooster Bob Dylan. A farm indeed, the Arpins planted maple (thus the name), oak and spruce trees, a small crop of alfalfa, a vineyard, an apple orchard and a truly lovely enclosed garden of raised beds with a greenhouse in the center.

Additionally, the farm had a little red barn, a swimming pool and pump house with special touches like a black school bell (Lori was a teacher at Cataldo Catholic School for decades), a cannon, weather vanes, birdhouses and toile curtains that dressed the windows of this remarkable home.

With newlyweds Sarah and Megan married and starting their families ~ and retirement a new chapter for the couple, it was time to downsize to a smaller cottage near Cannon Hill Park.

Highlight ~ To honor their wonderful life in Hangman Valley, Lori commissioned this memory-filled portrait of their beloved Maple Tree Farm.

"RICH & LINDA'S LAKESIDE LODGE" (PRIEST LAKE, ID • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 1998 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When my parents downsized from their mid-century modern in the Spokane Valley suburbs, they chose a view condominium at Mountain View Estates above Millwood on Argonne Lane.

Their next door neighbor was a friendly high school teacher named Rich who was approaching retirement from a Spokane Valley high school.

When that day finally arrived, Rich sold his condominium and moved to a scenic spot on Priest Lake to share life with his longtime love Linda.

They married and together built a large new log home to replace the small one-room cottage that had served as their Summer placce on the lake’s shoreline. Decades old and riddled with dry rot, the cabin had become uninhabitable and downright dangerous, so it was slated for demolition.

To surprise his bride, Rich took several photos of the place before it was torn down and commissioned this portrait. I pictured the newlyweds on the front deck overlooking a brilliant Autumn scene dotted with wildlife.

 

BEST WISHES FOR A HEARTFELT, HAPPY AND VERY COZY WINTER!

 

 

Click on BIG LIST • SPOKANE COLLECTION OR the Red Pointer graphic header here to access ALL the titiles in thIs collection. Titles of art in this Winter 2022 edition are in RED CAPS alphabetically by group. These link you with bold red type to pages throughout the web site.

 

 

 

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