Spokane is the largest city in Eastern Washington, but it has always enjoyed a friendly, small-town feel. Folks really love living in Eastern Washington's Inland Northwest. Spokane is my home town.

THE BEGINNING ~ In 1871, the first white settler to stake a claim in Spokane Falls ("Falls" was later dropped) was Seth Scranton. However, James N. Glover is known as the "Father of Spokane" as he shaped the area bordering the falls into a town. The railroad, timber and rich ore nearby brought enormous wealth ~ making millionaires of many, although a huge fire burned most of Spokane in 1889, slowing its growth.

KEY PLAYERS ~ Kirtland K. Cutter, Amasa Campbell, Patsy Clark, Daniel C. Corbin, F. Rockwood Moore, James Glover, Louis B. Davenport, Francis Cook, Aubrey White, J.J. Browne, A.M. Cannon, J.P. Graves, William Cowles and others gave the city its complexion. These highly successful men built grand mansions for their families and imposing downtown buildings to proclaim their wealth. Remarkably, many of these structures are still in beautiful condition.

PRESERVATION & THE TOP 10 ~ After World War II, when other cities were tearing down structures, an economic slump had folks here restoring properties. The South Hill in particular is filled with vintage homes built in the '20s, '30s and '40s ~ many as pretty as when originally constructed. Add to that the school system, beautiful parks, manicured golf courses, 70+ lakes, bike trails, ski resorts ~ and the very active Spokane Preservationist Advocates (SpokanePreservation.org) organization.

FULL CIRCLE ~ In 2012, Doug and I moved from Seattle back to Spokane. We were both born here, although Doug grew up on Bellevue's Clyde Hill. Fond childhood memories inspired much of the art in this "Spokane Collection" as the community is filled with endless inspiring subjects for an artist like me to recreate. If you grew up here, you'll see dozens of beloved familiar settings below.

Highlight ~ Spokane was recently rated among the top 10 cities in the U.S. for its quality of life by AARP Magazine. Many "Baby Boomers" are coming home.

 

THE HOLIDAYS 2018 ~ SEVEN GROUPS IN THE "SPOKANE" COLLECTION

I've divided this collection into seven groups with sub-categories. Each group highlights neighborhoods, communities and well-known beloved regional areas. In most cases, the artwork revolves with and reflects the seasons and holidays.

NEW ARTWORK, GROUP PDFS &"THE BIG LIST"

ENJOY ~ and click on Ordering for details on purchasing any of the artwork featured here (now accepting Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express).

 

 

 

 

SPOKANE'S DOWNTOWN DISTRICT ~ 2 NEW! (BELOVED ICONIC SIGNATURE STRUCTURES)

The Entire Downtown District Collection pdf ~ Click on this 2-page pdf to see all 10 paintings.

"THE CRESCENT WINDOW AT CHRISTMASTIME" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Crescent Department Store was THE place to shop when I was a youngster growing up in Spokane, Washington.

It opened in 1889, the year of the big Spokane fire that virtually destroyed the greater downtown area. The store served faithfully (nearly a century) until 1988 when it was sold to the F&N (Frederick & Nelson) Acquisition Corporation.

Our annual tradition, as it was with many Spokane families at the time, was the yearly visit to the downtown Crescent Department Store for pictures with Santa Claus. I was six when this photo was taken ~ and my sisters and me were dressed in red plaid taffetas created by my mother Sally. After photos, we always stopped by the signature animated store window which was filled with lights, baubles and figures (Santa, his elves and more) that moved in time to Christmas music.

Highlight ~ At the 2014 Arbor Crest Art & Glass Festival, one of the men responsible for the animated Crescent Store window stopped by to take a look at this artwork. He recognized the elves and colorful candy confections as some he had created decades ago ~ sharing stories with me and clients at my booth about his 30+ years at the beloved department store.

"THE CHRISTMAS LOOFF CAROUSEL" (RIVERFRONT PARK, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I.D. Looff finished his carousel (SpokaneCarousel.org) in 1909. It was elaborate in every detail with dozens of multi-sized mirror panels and 180 glittering lights. Too expensive for its original home at Natatorium Park at a price of $20,000, Looff struck a special deal. If the park would allow his son Louis Vogel to run the carousel and other concessions on a percentage basis, Looff would ship the carousel to the park as a wedding gift for his daughter Emma.

When Nat Park closed in 1968, its property developed into a mobile home park, the carousel was dismantled and stored. With the opening of Spokane’s World Fair, Expo 74 at 100-acre Riverfront Park, one of the most anticipated events was the re-opening of the carousel ~ not just for viewing, but for riding! Housed in a protective building, this merry-go-round was available again to children of all ages.

A few years ago, Spokane's local government asked voters to approve several ambitious improvements to Riverfront Park, one of which was a more robust structure to house the beloved carousel. Once again, the apparatus and horses were carefully dismantled and put into storage. Its new home was scheduled for opening in late spring 2018.

Highlight ~ In 2017, I painted this holiday-themed alteration for Michael Bagley's carousel-themed tree ~ the fifth appearance of my fine art in the Spokane Symphony Christmas Tree Elegance Benefit.

NEW! "MERRY MEETING AT THE FLOUR MILL" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT/THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The historic Flour Mill has served Spokane as a unique destination for years.

Built in 1895, it was one a number of similar mills built on the banks of the Spokane River. These businesses took advantage of the majestic falls for their power in the late 1800s before F. Rockwood Moore developed Washington Water Power (later Avista).

The mill was initially involved in an explosive lawsuit ~ one of the most difficult, hard fought battles in the history of the community ~ which kept it from commencing operation until 1900.

The structure was repurposed into a quaint shopping center in 1974 to coincide with Spokane’s Expo ‘74. Clinkerdagger’s (Clinkerdagger.com) has been serving locals and guests for years as one of the most picturesque places to dine in the city.

Highlight ~ The old Flour Mill has stood for years as a reminder of the community’s early wealth that was fueled by the beautiful falls that slice through the center of the Downtown District.

"FLYING SOUTH OVER SPOKANE FALLS (HUNTINGTON PARK)" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Not only did famed architect Kirtland K. Cutter create dozens of beautiful homes and handsome andmark buildings in Spokane, he also lent his design flair to other projects.

This portrayed the majestic Monroe Street Bridge, which spanned the river at the west end of downtown Spokane. In 1910, John Ralston, Spokane’s city engineer and designer of the grand bridge, invited Cutter to design its decorative handrails and lookout stations, which featured life-size reliefs of bison skulls.

The photo here showed the bridge just after its construction. In the background was another famous landmark, the Washington Water Power Post Street Substation. Cutter designed that massive brick and basaltic rock industrial building in 1909.

Recently, Huntington Park situated on the south side of the falls was given a formal restoration with the installation of lawn, a basaltic rock terraced gardens and assorted decorative plantings ~ creating a very inviting space for folks to not only view the cascading water, but stay a while and enjoy a picnic in the scenic spot.

Highlight ~ WWP’s first CEO, Frank Rockwood Moore, gave Cutter one of his first residential commissions ~ a stunning Turdor-Revival (now demolished) on the property between the D.C. Corbin House and the F. Lewis Clark House which later served as the parking lot for the restored Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens.

"BREAKING NEWS AT THE REVIEW BUILDING" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JUNE 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This unique building in downtown Spokane was designed and built in 1890 after the Great Spokane Fire by Chauncey B. Seaton, although he left before the construction project was complete. Seaton designed it to fit the unusual shaped lot. It is one of the city’s tallest buildings and houses the principal newspaper, the Spokesman Review (Spokesman.com).

In 1883, Frank Dallam began the Review, which competed with the Spokesman, a newspaper owned by a group of local businessmen. In order to survive, the papers merged into one. Then the Panic of 1893 threatened to kill it, so W.H. Cowles came out from Chicago to salvage the newspaper and became the sole owner of the new Spokesman Review. He later purchased the Spokane Daily Chronicle.

His son W.H. Cowles II and grandson W.H. Cowles III were very influential members of the Spokane community. W.H. Cowles III served as director of the Associated Press for 33 years. When I painted this piece, the generous, civic-minded family still owned and operated the paper.

Highlight ~ Years after W.H. Cowles first took over the paper, his descendents orchestrated the building of downtown Spokane's Riverpark Square Shopping Mall.

"DALLYING AT THE DAVENPORT" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I gave this artwork a late 1940s timeframe, painting Louis M. Davenport's legendary hotel in the heart of downtown Spokane as it looked decades ago. To the right is the Pennington Hotel and at the forefront, Davenport’s luxurious restaurant.

Designed by famed architect, Kirtland K. Cutter, the Davenport Hotel (TheDavenportHotel.com) opened in 1914 to become an icon on Spokane’s skyline for decades.

With Davenport’s death in 1951, the hotel was sold to the company that owned Seattle's grand Olympic Hotel, but it gradually declined and finally closed 1985.

After years of neglect and possible demolition, Walt and Karen Worthy purchased it in 2000. After countless hours of renovation, restoration and careful attention to detail, they reopened the grand “lady” in 2002, giving Spokane and all of its visitors back this truly remarkable treasure. (Photo courtesy of the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture.)

Highlight ~ For decades, folks have fount the festive "Christmas Tree Elegance" on the Mezzanine Level of the Davenport Hotel and at Riverpark Square during the early Holiday Season.

 

 

SPOKANE COUNTY & STATE PARKS ~ (CANNON HILL, MANITO, MOORE-TURNER HERITAGE GARDENS RIVERFRONT, MOUNT SPOKANE, RIVERSIDE STATE PARK AND MORE)

Entire Spokane Parks Collection pdf ~ Click on this 5-page pdf to see all 19 paintings.

"CAVORTING AT CANNON HILL POND" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Cannon Hill Park was created just west down the hill from Saint Augustine’s Parish where I attended grade school.

There was little property for playgrounds in the 1950s-60s, so in winter, the 6th-, 7th- and 8th-graders were allowed to skate on the pond during recess. The boys played hockey and the girls twirled and skated backwards (we all dreamed of joining the “Ice Capades”).

The site of the Washington Brick & Lime Co. in the 1880s (used for many South Hill homes), when the clay deposits ran out, the Adam’s family (relatives of John Quincy Adams) donated 13 acres for Adams Park, later named for real estate developer A.M. Cannon

. In 1910, the famed Olmsted brothers designed the park, including a large pond with basaltic rock bridges, two pergolas and a wading pool for children ~ no longer in place.

This work is filled with family and friends ~ including the Roberts, McCarthy and Shelledy kids. The Shelledys lived in the brick two-story shown overlooking the pond.

Highlight ~ Folks still groom and skate on this beloved pond today.

"SLEDDING ON THE SOUTH HILL (MANITO PARK" (MANITO PARK, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WASHINGTON • OCTOBER 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This piece pictured Manito Park’s (TheFriendsOfManito.org) sledding hill on the corner of Grand Boulevard & 18th Avenue as it looked in the late 1950s at Manito Park on Spokane's South Hill.

I painted friends and family enjoying a crisp winter day at the park after a fresh snowfall ~ something folks in the neighborhood have done since 1904 when the beloved park was established.

In 1959, my parents gave me an aluminum “Flying Saucer” for Christmas. All of us kids had our “Flexible Flyer” sleds, but these metal discs were the latest thing! We sat down in the center, crossed our legs, grabbed the leather handles on both sides ~ and prayed we didn't hit a tree on the way down because steering was out of the question.

Highlight ~ There were two sides of the hill ~ a smaller one by the picnic area for the younger set and a larger one adjacent to the street that the bigger kids poured water on to speed up the ride. This sheet of ice guaranteed a VERY swift trip to the bottom ~ steering sleds was impossilbe. There was always a kid or two every season that ended up at the hospital when a tree stopped their ride!

"VISTA HOUSE VIEW" (MOUNT SPOKANE STATE PARK • PAINTED OCTOBER 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 9X12-INCH)

This artwork portrayed the historic Vista House on a gorgeous sunny day with friends, family and a group of eager young S.S.R.A. racers (Spokane Ski Racing Association) in the scene.

Located at the summit of Mount Spokane (MountSpokane.com) near the top of the #1 chairlift, this unique granite stone cottage was the design of Spokane architect, Henry C. Bertelsen. It was built during the Great Depression in 1933 by the Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.) who was headquartered at Riverside State Park on Spokane’s North Side.

It was constructed to blend with its stunning, natural setting. Renovated in 2002 by Mount Spokane State Park, once again it opened its doors to the public on Sundays and holidays, offering light fare and a huge, friendly fireplace.

Highlight ~ Decades later, folks can still find hot chocolate when they hike up to the Vista House during ski season.

"THE GOLDEN LOOFF CAROUSEL (RIVERFRONT PARK) (DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, WA • JANUARY 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Opened in 1940, the Mount Spokane (MountSpokane.com) Lodge was a huge upgrade to original developer’s Francis H. Cook’s rustic cabin.

It served the fledgling ski area of Mount Spokane State Park with dining rooms, fireplaces, a lounge, dormitory and a waxing room for skis.

In 1952, this handsome Craftsman-style lodge was about to reopen with a sprawling three-story addition when it exploded into flames, killing one of two on-site workmen and leaving nothing but ashes and rubble. As nearly everything was gone, a decision was made to move the ski area to the less windy east side of the mountain for the public to use going forward.

Highlight ~During World War II, the lodge served personnel from nearby military bases. The Alpine ski instructors were German and Austrian internees paroled to the FBI in Spokane for the duration of the war. (Image courtesy of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture.)

 

BROWNE'S ADDITION ~ 1 NEW! (REMARKABLE RESIDENCES AND THE MAC'S RESTORED AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE)

Entire Browne's Addition Collection pdf ~ Click on this 6-page pdf to see all 27 paintings (14 Browne's Addition settings and 13 of the historic Campbell House).

"HOME SWEET HOME" IN BROWNE'S ADDITION (LIFE IN SPOKANE'S FIRST AND OLDEST NEIGHBORHOOD)

"THE CHRISTMAS HOUSE (LOEWENBERG-ROBERTS HOUSE)" (BROWE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 1997 •ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Loewenberg-Roberts House on First Avenue was designed by W.J. Carpenter for Bernard Loewenberg in 1889. Loewenberg owned a dry goods store nearby on Riverside Avenue, which floundered financially to the point that he was compelled to trade his home for another in the neighborhood owned by E.J. Roberts.

Built in the Queen Anne Victorian style, Carpenter designed the house using a unique decorative blend of granite, wood and brick ~ resulting in an unusually beautiful home.

In Browne’s Addition where many of the larger mansions had been converted into apartment houses after World War II to accommodate returning soldiers, this the Roberts House remained home to this family well into the 20th Century. 

Mary Moltke purchased this mansion toward the end of the last century and began an ambitious restoration project, re-opening it as an upscale inn and special event center in the 1990s.

Highlight ~ After reaching retirement age, Mary recently made the decision to sell her beautiful architectural gem to new owners.

"WINTER AT THE WAKEFIELD HOUSE" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Wakefield Mansion, once the family residence of lawyer and capitalist, W.J.C. Wakefield, was designed and built in Browne’s Addition in 1897 by famed Spokane architect Kirtland K. Cutter.

Created in the classic Mission Revival style, it was located on the lot west of Amasa Campbell’s Tudor four-story. This was just one of several elegant residences near Coeur D’Alene Park commissioned by the community’s new wealthy businessmen who wished to proclaim their financial success in the form of spectacular family homes.

This painting celebrated the theme of holiday gatherings. Note the turkey in the dining room window and folks arriving with hot dishes to contribute to the feast.

Highlight ~ In the late 1940s, thousands of servicemen were returning from fighting in World War II, so large structures such as the one in this painting were divided into several apartments.

"AUTUMN AFTERNOON AT PATSY CLARK'S" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Patrick Clark Mansion (PatsyClarks.com) across from the Coeur d’Alene Park on 2nd Avenue and Hemlock Street was the fine work of architect Kirtland Kelsey Cutter. The flamboyant design of this three-story residence was inspired by the palaces of Islamic Spain. Constructed beige-gold brick with a crimson tile roof, it stood out dramatically in a neighborhood of Tudor-Revivals and Queen Anne Victorians.

Born in Ireland of poor parents, 20-year old Patrick Clark arrived in the United States in 1870 and chose mining for his career path. He worked in several states before joining a Spokane syndicate, partnering with high-profile businessmen Finch, Campbell, Wakefield and Corbin.

He moved his family into this opulent mansion in 1897 after living temporarily in the Fotheringham House across the street directly east. For a time in the 1980s and 1990s, the residence was a very popular fine restaurant named after him. Later on in the 2000s, the grand mansion was purchased by a group of successful attorneys who installed their offices on the second floor. A further renovation and restoration was completed, making the first floor a sought after event center for weddings and other social functions.

Highlight ~ When Doug and I were courting in 1997, I brought him to Spokane to meet my mother. We chose Patsy Clark's as our restaurant for that special introductory dinner.

"THE PHELPS HOUSE IN THE FALL" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED FOCTOBER 2005 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome brick and basaltic rock Colonial Revival-style home was built in Spokane’s Browne’s Addition in the late 1800s, it was thought by D.B. Fotheringham.

The Moses A. Phelps family lived there from 1986 to 1954. On his journey to Seattle, Phelps arrived in Spokane Falls and was enchanted by its beauty. He decided to stay in the community by the falls and opened the very successful M.A. Phelps Lumber Company, supplying timber for the construction of both the Spokane County Court House and the Division Street Bridge.

This painting featured folks celebrating Autumn in the front yard of the residence. My friend Mary Doohan suggested this home for a painting when it was owned by a friend of hers.

Highlight ~ I pictured the two of us bringing freshly baked pies to this group enjoying the fine Autumn day.

 

THE AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE (GRACIOUS LIVING FOR THE FAMILY AND THEIR SERVANTS AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY)

"TOURING THE CAMPBELL HOUSE" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2011 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8x10-INCH)

2016 marked the milestone 100th birthday of the MAC (Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture) (NorthwestMuseum.org). Located in the heart of historic Browne’s Addition, Spokane’s first residential neighborhood, the Amasa Campbell House portrayed here became "jewel" in the crown of the MAC complex.

At one time, the mansion housed the museum, but a new modern complex was built and an ambitious restoration that progressed for decades was begun on the Campbell House from the basement through the second floor. Folks who had purchased the Campbell’s furniture gave many of the signature pieces back to help the project along.

This mansion was particularly luxurious as Campbell was a very wealthy man through his mining partnership with neighbors John A. Finch, Patrick Clark and W.J.C. Wakefield.  When a fairly large portion of the restoration was complete, the museum began offering tours of the Campbell House ~ frequently with docents on hand to answer questions and share stories about this historic Spokane family.

Highlight ~ A scrapbook with samples of wallpaper and other important details pertaining to the house was compiled during its initial construction in 1899. This was found in the linen closet in the third floor maid’s quarters during the mansion's restoration ~ a huge help to the ambitious project.

NEW! "CHRISTMAS AT THE CAMPBELL COACH HOUSE" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This artwork was inspired by a story my mother Sally shared with me about her father and brothers hauling truckloads of wood for burning in their fireplaces and other uses south from the Smith property in Springdale to the Campbell’s grand mansion in Browne’s Addition.

History confirmed that the wealthy Campbells decorated their home with greenery that included a Christmas tree, so perhaps the festive scene here was more than a legend.

Decades ago, the journey to Spokane took most of the day as it was made over rutted dirt roads that were not much better than logging roads.

Much of the Smith’s acreage was heavily forested, so selling firewood and other wood products brought in quite a bit of money during winter when ranching and farming was reduced to caring for livestock and milking cows. A trip to town was welcomed treat ~ especially during the Holiday Season!

"CHRISTMAS AT THE CAMPBELL HOUSE)" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2005 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Campbell family’s focal point was the library on the main floor of their grand residence. Located left of the entryway, it was finished in rich dark oak echoing the woodwork in the hallway.

Dark beams set off the ceiling in the library and the handsome carved Gothic arch over the fireplace. This room provided the family with a warm and inviting place for casual relaxation like listening to music, reading and playing board games.

The Campbells also hosted parties and dances here, as well as more formal events like weddings and funerals. On June 27th, 1917, the library was festooned with blossoms to host the wedding celebration of the Campbell’s only daughter Helen to William Powell.

Highlight ~ This room has been opened to the MAC members and guests at Christmastme for their Annual Open House.

"COOKIES IN THE KITCHEN" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2011 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The red and white kitchen with its white octagonal tile floor must have been a hub of activity when the Campbell family lived in their grand residence.

It was conveniently located across the hall from the servants’ dining room on one side and next to the butler’s pantry, which served the formal dining room on the other.

All of the meals for the Campbell family as well as the staff of servants were prepared here. The focal point was the huge, ornate Majestic wood stove with ovens for baking, roasting and keeping things warm and a cook-top large enough to accommodate several skillets and saucepans at the same time. To the left of the range was a large walk-in pantry equipped with a glass-windowed oak ice-box storage unit. I gave this piece a cookie-baking theme, as I’m certain plenty of that was going on between during the holiday season.

Highlight ~ During past Holiday Open Houses, this space was open for guests to explore ~ including the rarely seen butler’s pantry ~ all while munching on a freshly baked warn cookies!

 

THE SOUTH HILL ~ 2 NEW! (CHARMING HOMES AND PUBLIC PLACES ON WHAT IS KNOWN SIMPLY AS "THE HILL")

Entire South Hill Collection pdf ~ Click on the 15-page pdf to see all 74 images.

"HOMES SWEET HOME" ON THE SOUTH HILL (CANNON HILL/MANITO, CLIFF PARK, HIGH DRIVE, LOWER SOUTH HILL, ROCKWOOD, OVERBLUFF, PERRY DISTRICT AND MORE)

"KIDS AT THE FUN FOURSQUARE (ANDERSON-TORMEY HOUSE)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JUNE 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This portrait pictured the historic Louise Anderson House, designed and built by prominent Spokane architect Randolph Smith in 1922. It has remained one of the most handsome homes on the block.

On scenic Manito Boulevard, the residence was later listed as a historic landmark on the Spokane and the National Registers of Historic Places. When I painted this piece, retired WSU professor Linda Holloway (note “Holloway Flyer” on the sled) fell in love with the handsome brick foursquare, purchased it and began an ambitious remodeling/restoration project on the property.

She worked hard to carefully recreate its original feel and classic simple style, but made certain it was also comfortable and inviting.

Blessed with family and grandchildren nearby, her house became a jolly hub of merry activity at Christmastime ~ as pictured in this scene featuring all of the kids in the foreground. .

"NINTH AVENUE ~ ICE SKATER BALL (COMSTOCK-SHADLE HOUSE)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X104-INCH)

Spokane has always been a sports lovers’ playground during the snowy winter months. Skiing, sledding and ice-skating topped the list.

Several city ponds and nearby lakes scattered throughout Spokane County froze over whenever the temperatures dropped into the teens, some with huge stone outdoor fireplaces for hardy outdoor merrymakers ~ thus the “Ice Skater Ball” theme.

I pictured my husband and me on the frosty front walkway flanked by a friendly snowman with ice skates dangling from his arms. Note the frozen pond and blazing fire behind the mansion.

This handsome Tudor Revival home was one of four similar Comstock-Shadle family houses on 9th Avenue. Acclaimed architect Willis A. Ritchie, who also designed the ornate Spokane County Courthouse, created the plans for this mansion built in 1910 for James and Elizabeth Comstock.

”CHRISTMAS LIGHTS ON 25TH & BERNARD" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1993 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I painted five portraits (my favorite home growing up) of the historic Codd House where our family lived for a decade from 1952 to 1962. This classic Dutch Colonial was built by Dr. Codd in the 1920s as a wedding gift for his son and his new wife.

The living/dining room suite featured unique gumwood built-in bookcases, windows, French doors and crown molding. My creative mother who was an accompished seamstress, decorated the home in English cottage-style, creating chintz slip covers for the sofa that matched the wallpaper in the adjoining dining room.

When Bernard Street was widened into a busy arterial, our family moved to the suburbs of Spokane Valley and the residence was purchased by the Sullivan family.

Subsequently, the Starbucks became the fourth family to own it in 2002 and they gave the house a fresh, new look. This piece pictured our family decorating the two-story with multi-colored Christmas lights ~ one of our very favorite Christmas traditions while living here.

Highlight ~ When I finished this painting in 1993 and gave it to my mother for Christmas, the scene brought tears to her eyes as my father had passed just five years earlier.

NEW! "JEANNIE PARKER'S PRETTY PLACE ON CANNON HILL (GROMBACHER-HERRICK HOUSE)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2017 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS ~ 8X10-INCH)

The historic Grombacher-Herrick House (commonly know as the Dr. Parker House) was built in 1924 on West Shoshone by Joseph J. Lorenze, who lived less that a block away. Several significant families lived here, among them the Grombachers (music shop owners who also managed the Liberty Theater), the Herricks (Milwaukee Lumber Company and Palouse Oil & Gas) and the Winklers (Wm. Winkler Paving Contractors).

But the fifth owners were the most well known. Dr. Robert Parker and wife Jeannie (Marcella) moved into the 2-1/2 story in 1956, raising their family of seven children.

The Parker House was a classic brick Tudor-Revival with a steeply pitched gabled roof, narrow multi-paned windows and stucco cladding. These strong architectural elements were reminiscent of charming, comfortable English/European residences ~ indicative of the development of homes overlooking Cannon Hill Pond from the 1920s to the 1940s.

For decades, Dr. Parker hosted caroling in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve ~ opening his home afterwards to friends and neighbors. Guest of honor Saint Nicholas (a local firefighter?) stopped by the crowd with a bag of treats for the kiddos. Former neighbors remember this annual tradition fondly.

Highlight ~ Last year, when I gave Doctor Bob his Christmas gift of this art, it was titled "Pretty Parker Place on Cannon Hill." For his family, he asked me to change the name to "Jeannie Parker's Pretty Place..." as she insisted he buy this house for her when he was dead set against it decades ago. The Parkers stayed there over 60 years!

 

 

SOUTH HILL PUBLIC PLACES (iCONIC CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED SMALL BUSINESSES)

Coming Soon! NEW Artwork of the Whimsical Windmill in the Perry District created with a St. Paddy's Day Theme

"SNOWFALL AT SAINT AUGUSTINES" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When I grew up in Spokane, my first twelve years were spent at Saint Augustine’s (StAugustineSpokane.CatholicWeb.com) where my family attended Mass and grade school on Spokane’s South Hill. The school building  functioned as the church for decades, but in the 1940s, Father (later Monsignor) Stephen P. Buckley drove the fund-raising for a new church.

Designed by the John W. Maloney architects, Walter G. Meyers & Son contractors built the church. They used brick veneer and Indiana limestone for the exterior with a cornerstone of red carnelian granite from Minnesota.

Bishop Charles C. White dedicated the new church on October 1, 1950. Later Father Buckley had landscaped terraced gardens added to honor the Seven Sorrows of Mary ~ creating a remarkably beautiful setting. I completed this work to commemorate the 100th birthday of the parish. Monsignor Buckley left Saint Augustine’s in 1968 and years later my husband and I purchased the brick bungalow where he spent his retirement years (this was the view from the front porch).

"SNOWMEN ON THE SOUTH HILL (ROCKWOOD BAKERY)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Three whimsical snowmen punctuate the charming portrait of this beloved icon a half block east of Manito Park on Spokane’s South Hill

. Whether the weather was chilly as pictured here or warm for al fresco dining on the deck of the historic 18th Avenue setting, the Rockwood Bakery has always been full of loyal patrons.

For folks with a sweet tooth and discerning love of good coffee and tea, from the day it opened, the Rockwood Bakery has been a favorite.

When my sister’s fiancé was working on the hardwood floors in our nearby vintage bungalow, he breakfasted every single morning here.

Highlight ~ the structure once served the neighborhood as a small grocery store in the early 1900s and was the first market to offer its customers meat lockers to freeze their large quantity purchases.

"WINTER CAMPUS AT LEWIS & CLARK (HIGH SCHOOL)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This lower South Hill setting on Fourth Avenue was home to three prominent schools. Spokane Central School was founded in 1883 as a two-story, four-room schoolhouse. Eight years later, an elaborately beautiful Victorian brick building was constructed there as South Central High School. Tragically, fire gutted the structure, leaving only its shell.

$500,000 was raised, acclaimed L.L. Rand was chosen as the architect, and students traveled across town to North Central High School while the European Gothic-style building was under construction.

North Central’s Principal Richard Hargreaves won a contest sponsored by The Spokane Chronicle with the name “Lewis & Clark” for the High School. President Theodore Roosevelt laid its cornerstone in 1911. I created this piece with a post-WW II time period and gave it a winter theme.

Highlight ~ I dedicated it to my father Joe Simpson who loyally attended many L.C. class reunions until his death in 1987.

NEW! "LATTES AT LINDAMAN'S" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 2017 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Lindaman’s Bistro has always been a favorite gathering spot for folks living on the South Hill and beyond. Located on 13th and Grand Boulevard south of Saint John the Evangelist Cathedral (its spires visible in this artwork), this beloved bistro opened in 1984.

Many thought it was an outbuilding of the church, but the modest structure was built in about 1910 to house the Triesch Bros. Mercantile. Peter Triesch was my friend Sara Weaver-Lundberg’s grandfather. Mary Triesch shared stories of the employees watching the huge church going up in 1925.

Later, the mercantile’s name was changed to Summit Supply Co. Although a rather plain building by most
masonry standards, the front of the structure was blessed with some unique decorative patterns in its brickwork.

Highlight ~ This cheerful scene was painted as a gift for Bistro Owner Merrilee Lindaman.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE ~ 1 NEW! (HANDSOME HOMES, GONZAGA UNIVERISTY AND BELOVED PUBLIC PLACES)

Entire North Side Collection pdf ~ Click on the 7-page pdf to see all 31 images)

"HOME SWEET HOME" ON THE NORTH SIDE (CHARMING RESIDENCES IN THE NETTLETON NEIGHBORHOOD, THE UNIVERSITY DISTRICT INDIAN TRAIL AND MORE)

"THE OLD MAXWELL-PETTET PLACE" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1995 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This snowy scene portrayed the old Maxwell-Pettet place located on picturesque West Point Road. This sprawling North Side residence was reputed to be the oldest home in the community according to Spokane’s Public Records. The original small cottage was built by the Pettet family who sold it a short time later to the Maxwells ~ which is how the home got its name.

The Maxwells lived in this residence for several decades. Eventually, the property was sold to the Powell family.

Over the years, the original wood cottage was encased and added on to, resulting in this remarkably pretty rambling residence in the woods on the cliffs overlooking the Spokane River and old Fort George Wright.

Highlight ~ William Powell married Helen Campbell, the only daughter of Amasa and Grace who raised their daughter in the historic Tudor Revivial Campbell House, part of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture. The Campbell House is pictured above on this page.

"FLOWERFIELD IN THE FALL (DAVENPORT SUMMER HOME AND SAINT GEOGE'S SCHOOL)" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JUNE 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Located on the banks of the Little Spokane River on Spokane’s North Side, Flowerfield was once the 440-acre summer estate of Louis Davenport and his family. The property was sold in 1955 and 120 acres of it became Saint George’s Schoo (SGS.org)l.

The Davenport’s lovely two-story residence is still part of the private school’s campus. Louis Davenport was known for hiring outstanding architects and commissioned renowned architects Kirtland K. Cutter and Karl Malmgren to design what was to become one of the grandest hotels in Spokane’s history.

Closed for decades, the Davenport Hotel was restored to its former glory by Walt and Karen Worthy, and re-opened to the public in the early 2000s. (Photo courtesy of John Meyer)

Highlight ~ Once the summer getaway for the Davenport family, Flowerfield became an event center at Saing George’s School.

"CHRISTMAS QUEEN ANNE" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1995 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was the second portrait that I painted of the Joe Doohan home for the family when they were living in the North Side neighborhood during the early years of their marriage. The first painting was done with a Halloween trick-or-treating theme and you'll often find it featured on my autumn web site.

This Victorian was located a few short blocks north of Gonzaga University. The charming two-story with its "witches hat" roofline was in pretty disastrous shape due to several different households of students who had abused the structure during their tenure of renting it. It reminded me of the house in “It’s a Wonderful Life," as when I first saw this house, it was similar to the one featured in the Jimmy Stewart/Donna Reed classic Christmas film.

Joe and Mary painstakingly transformed it with months of scraping, painting, refinishing and updating. Charmingly detailed both inside and out, this home created many happy memories for the very young Doohan family when the couple was starting their family.

Highlight ~ Mary Doohan sponsored and helped me for years at the Spokane Club's Holiday Artisan Fair in the early 2000s, so I painted this portrait of their home and gave her the original artwork. The couple used this as Christmas card art in 1995.

"NORTH SIDE NOEL" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1987 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was a portrait of the classic Queen Anne-style home that my father grew up in just before the Great Depression hit Spokane in the late 1920s.

Life had been very prosperous for the Simpson family and they not only owned this beautiful home, but another that added to the family’s revenue as a rental. Pictured in front of the three-story Victorian were my dad Joseph and his little sister Wanda, about to take their “Flexible Flyer” sled out for a ride.

Sadly, the Depression spelled disaster for this family as it did for so many others. The Simpsons experienced hard times and lost all their properties to foreclosure ~ an all too common fate in the tragic time.

A highway was constructed through the property decades later, so this pretty Victorian was demolished in that process. Luckily my grandmother Jessie Simpson kept several photographs of it, which made this portrait possible.

Highlight ~ I gave prints of the finished painting to my dad and aunt for Christmas in 1987, which was fortuitous as a few short month later, my father passed away from heart disease.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S GONZAGA PREP AND GONZAGA UNIVERSITY (FR. JOSEPH CATALDO S.J.'S JESUIT RENOWNED HIGH SCHOOL AND JESUIT UNIVERSITY)

"CROSBY CRAFTSMAN" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • JULY 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome two-story craftsman house cottage was home to Hollywood’s most famous crooner Bing Crosby and one of Hollywood's most memorable actors during his years of growing up on Spokane’s North Side ~ although Harry L. Crosby was born in Tacoma, Washington.

Located adjacent to Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.Edu) campus, Crosby was a huge booster of the college during his lifetime and did a great deal for the university, including fundraising and donating the famous Crosby Library.

Although Bing never finished earning his degree at Gonzaga, in later years he was awarded a special honorary degree, an especially meaningful occasion for him.

For many years, Crosby's craftsman served as the home for the Gonzaga Alumni Association, which later moved to the Huetter House across Boone Avenue from this house.

Highlight ~ My father met Bing Crosby when the actor was in town and came to listen to the band my dad was playing in during his college years.

"THE HISTORIC HUETTER HOUSE" (GONAZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • MAY 2007 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH))

John Huetter started work on this stately mansion in 1889. In the construction business ~ and a fine stone mason and brick layer ~ he was also responsible for Gonzaga University’s (Gonzaga.Edu) DeSmet Hall and the Administration Building (College Hall). The great fire of 1889 provided other opportunities, such as the construction of the original St. Joseph’s Orphanage.

Huetter’s family of nine children were active in St. Aloysius parish. Several Catholic organizations used this house until 1956 when Bishop Bernard J. Topel dedicated it to the memory of Bishop Charles D. White (second bishop of the Spokane Diocese) and commissioned it as a Preparatory Seminary.

This painting was completed to honor its 50th year of preparing men for the priesthood. When a new seminary was built, a decision made to move the historic structure to its location near Bing Crosby’s residence where it began serving Gonzaga University as the alumni center.

Highlight ~ I pictured my brothers John, Bill and Bob Simpson as young altar boys in the foreground of this piece.

NEW! "GATHERING AT GONZAGA PREP" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED March 2017 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 9X12-INCH)

Gonzaga Prep (GPrep.com) was establlshed in 1887 by Father Joseph Cataldo and S.J. with eight other faculty members. It became one of four Jesuit High Schools in the Pacific Northwest acclaimed for “preparing students for life.”

Once known as Gonzaga High, from early years it had a solid relationship with Gonzaga University. Gonzaga High was located within the college at one setting or another wherever the institution moved ~ and some years, the tuition from its considerable student body helped keep the college afloat.

The high school split from the college administratively in 1926, but the permanent move to Euclid Avenue did not occur until 1954 after Father Gordon Toner, S.J. purchased 85 lots that ultimately comprised the campus. Ground was broken in 1953 and a year later, Gonzaga Preparatory School, Inc. began teaching its 610 male students. In 1975 with the close of Holy Names Academy (Marycliff High School followed in 1979), Gonzaga Prep opened its doors to women.

Also history making, in the late 1980s, Gonzaga Prep became the first Jesuit school in the United States to hire a lay president. When I painted this artwork, John Traynor’s longtime successor Al Falkner was completing his 43rd and final year of service with plans to retire at the end of the 2016-2017 school year.

Pictured on the right (front to back): Al Falkner, president in his last term; Joe Feryn, counselor and track coach; Phil Kuder, teacher and golf coach; and Fr. Peter Byrne, S.J., Superior Manresa community.

Highlight ~ This campus view inspired by Al, pictured the old school building, the Barbieri Student Center and the Chapel of the Three Companions with students enjoying a break between classes.

"CLASSMATES AT COLLEGE HALL (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY)" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • JUNE 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.Edu) owed its beginning to Italian-born missionary Fr. Joseph Cataldo, S.J. Often in poor health, he was a dynamo nonetheless and was appointed General Superior of the Rocky Mountain Mission in 1877 (eight residences and 38 members scattered throughout the Northwest). Competition with Protestants for access to local Native American tribes was the main reason for founding a Jesuit college in Spokane.

When it opened, applicants had to “know how to read and write, and not be under ten years of age.” Originally only white students were permitted to enroll. Railroad land was purchased in 1881, Gonzaga began educating in 1887 ~ and it was incorporated and able to grant degrees by 1896. A permanent residence and four-story building was completed by 1899. The hall’s entrance was further enhanced in April 2008 by the dedication of George Carlson’s Saint Ignatius statue, a reflection pool and new landscaping.

When I painted this piece, stately “College Hall” was still handling the university’s administrative duties and functioning as the key building on the beautiful campus.

Highlight ~ My dad Joseph A. Simpson attended both Gonzaga and Gonzaga Law School (the latter on the G.I. Bill). As a young newlywed, he continued his association with the law school, teachiing night class there the first few years of his marriage.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S PUBLIC PLACES (BELOVED SMALL BUSINESSES, NORTH SIDE SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES)

"SNOW CHAPEL AT HOLY NAMES" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2012 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

“Snow Chapel at Holy Names” (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WASHINGTON • PAINTED OCTOBER 2012 • 8X10-INCH)

This was the second rendition of my high school Holy Names Academy building painted 15 years after the first, “Celebrating Spring at HNA.” This work was completed in honor of the arrival of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary’s to the Pacific Northwest 125 years ago.

I pictured my classmates and younger sisters working on a chapel made of snow and twigs on the front campus grounds while our teachers looked on. The Victorian red brick building functioned as a “normal school” (teachers’ college) before it became a private school for girls.

Located a few blocks from Gonzaga University, HNA closed its doors in 1975 and the empty building sank into sad disrepair. In 1987, it was developed into “The Academy,” a non-denominational full-scale retirement community by local developer Harry A. Green.

Highlight ~ it was featured for a few minutes in the movie starring Johnny Depp, “Benny & Joon.”

"NOVEMBER AT OLD NORTH CENTRAL" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Until 1907, students only had Spokane High School (renamed South Central High) on Fourth & Howard to educate them. In 1908, North Central High School op

In 2010, Central Spokane High burned to the ground, so its students joined the N.C. student body while a replacement was built. A contest sponsored by the Spokane Chronicle to name the South Hill school was won by N.C.’s Principal Richard Hargreaves who came up with “Lewis & Clark.”

Important early guests to North Central included orator William Jennings Bryant and ex-slave Booker T. Washington. I gave this piece 1968 timeframe, picturing the “N.C. Indians” banner, cheerleaders, a football player, majorette, “Key Club” member, a female athlete in a letter sweater, ASB President Dave Westfall, Sue Saling (Betts) who was a huge help in researching this piece.

Highlight ~ During Spokane’s Expo 74, over 10,000 alumni gathered from around the world at the Spokane Coliseum for a mammoth all-class reunion. This handsome building was demolished in 1978 to make way for a modern structure.

"BREAKFAST BUNCH AT KNIGHT'S DINER" (THE NORTH SIDE • PAINTED MARCH 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Rail car #988 was commissioned by Ohio’s Barney & Smith, Co. and beautifully detailed by the Pullman Car Company of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania in 1906. The luxury dining car served the Northern Pacific Railroad’s Yellowstone Route until its retirement in 1920. Before it became a diner, the rail car served during World War II as an induction hall for the armed services.

Years later when Jack Knight left the elegant Davenport Hotel to open his own business, he converted the fine old dining car into his restaurant ~ thus the name Knight's Diner (KnightsDiner.com).

Located in Hillyard (incorporated into Spokane in 1924), in 1989, new owners moved the rail car to its current location on Market Street shown in this artwork. They added new paint, polished all the original fixtures and opened for business.

Located near Esmeralda Golf Course, this piece pictured the owner welcoming a group of lady golfers ~ me, sis Peggy Barton, mother Sally Simpson, niece Kelly Barton and pals Molly Roberts Hannan, Rita Drake and Carmen Perkins. In the foreground, I pictured friends Linda Ebner and Maria Herbert ready to bike home with their breakfasts as husband Doug arrived to treat our grandkid junior golfers Addison and Austin to a meal.

Highlight ~ Recently, I learned that my childhood chum Patty Edwards Hayenga's family owned the diner for a number of years when she was growing up. She shared that her father designed the café's signature sign picturing a knight on his steed poised for battle.

"GATHERING AT THE GARLAND MILK BOTTLE" (THE NORTH SIDE • PAINTED MARCH 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This piece pictured Paul E. Newman’s Benewah Creamery’s Milk Bottle building on Garland Avenue, the first of two in Spokane (this one constructed in 1934) of the six planned.

The milk bottle buildings were classic examples of “literalist” architecture as they advertised in a very real way exactly what they were selling. It was the Great Depression and the architectural firm of Whitehouse and Price (famous for the Hutton Settlement and other important local buildings) designed and built each for a hefty price tag of $3,700.

After decades of serving the community, the Benewah Creamery closed in 1978 and the milk bottle when on to house a variety of small businesses. When I painted this portrait, it was a diner that served the Garland District as Mary Lou’s Milk Bottle.

I painted students from North Side high schools ~ Rogers, Gonzaga Prep, North Central, Holy Names Academy and Shadle ~ in their school colors gathering for ice cream treats.

Highlight ~ In 2011, fire nearly destroyed the milk bottle and adjacent Fergusson’s Café, but after a year of rebuilding, the beloved historic icon reopened for business.

 

 

SPOKANE VALLEY ~ 1 NEW! (ARBOR CREST CELLARS, OLD MILLWOOD, THE NORTHWOOD NEIGHBORHOOD AND OTHERS)

Entire Spokane Valley Collection pdf ~ Click on this 3-page pdf to see all 17 paintings (5 of the Barton Snow Fort and 12 others).

NEW! "KRIS KRINGLE COMES TO THE CLIFF HOUSE (ARBOR CREST CELLARS)" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I painted this Holiday portrait of the Cliff House at Arbor Crest Cellars to honor a special tradition that occurred in the early 2000s in the Spokane Valley.

An avid aviator who flew his small plane out of Felts Field decorated it for several years to look like Santa In his sleigh. On Christmas Eve (weather permitting) he would take off and criss-cross the skies above the neighborhoods in the Valley for about 15 minutes. Folks of all ages came out into their streets to watch and wave to Saint Nicholas as he made his annual visit late in the evening. It was magical ~ thus the theme for this piece.

Royal Newton Riblet built his Florentine-style Cliff House Mansion to take advantage of the stunning view from his property’s perch overlooking the Spokane River. The grounds included a waterfall that continually recycled from bottom to top, a tram that went down his cliff to the river below, a life-size chess game and other marvels. When I completed this piece, the MIlke family owned the estate, home of Arbor Crest Cellars. 

Highlight ~ This artwork was created for Arbor Crest Cellars' 2018 Holiday Art Fest.

"FLEXIBLE FLYERS IN THE VALLEY (MORAN-HENRY HOUSE" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED AUTUST 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This Spokane Valley white brick Colonial home was built in 1940 for the Henry family on Boone Avenue on a large, gently sloping lot. Interestingly, its design was slightly asymmetrical as the left side of it was larger in width than the right.

In 1957, Joe and Rita Moran purchased the residence where they would raise their family of five children (L-R Georgia, Curt, Joey, Kathy and Marty) for nearly 20 years.

The property included an orchard to the left, an outdoor “living room” with white wrought iron furniture beneath the giant willow (note the lovely statue of the Blessed Mother) and a swimming pool behind the house ~ the setting for many warm weather gatherings with family and friends.

I gave this artwork a mid-1960s holiday theme, picturing the kids ready to enjoy the frosty afternoon sledding down a nearby slope. (Vintage photograph courtesy of Moran daughters Kathy Denenny and Georgia Ferguson.)

"BARTON SNOW FORT V" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This is the fifth and final alteration to a painting I completed years ago picturing my youngest sister Peggy’s family home in the Spokane Valley.After spending a decade or so living on the outskirts of San Francisco area and then Honolulu, Hawaii, they moved back to Spokane, Washington so that Jeff could take over his family’s automobile business.

Peggy and Jeff had this home built on a lot overlooking Millwood and they enjoyed a stupendous view of the Spokane Valley below. Their first child arrived on the scene soon thereafter. This portrait pictured the entire family as it was in 2014.

I swithered about whether or not to add the menagerie of pets they owned over the years, but finally decided not to as there were so many dogs, cats and other creatures that they would have outnumbered the family!

Pictured (L-R) Mikaila (son Michael’s new wife), Kelly, Jeff, Peggy, Brooklynn and Mark. As the family grew, I altered the piece to include new additions. I gave this final edition of this painting to Peggy when she celebrated her milestone 60th birthday.

Highlight ~ When Peggy and Jeff lived on Oahu, she fell in love with the islands as the lifestyle fit her like a glove. It was a huge adjustment for her to make the move back to Spokane, so as a nod to her happy island days, she had a bird of paradise stained glass window fitted into her front door.

"CHRISTMAS IN KOKOMO" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 1987• ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Doohans were in every way part of our Simpson family once we moved to the Kokomo suburban development in the early 1960s east of Spokane, Washington.

When Mike was employed by Boise-Cascade in the 1960s and sent to Spokane, he and his wife Winnie knew they wanted to stay. Meeting my parents and becoming members of their Catholic parish, a lifelong friendship began Mike purchased a local company that made sportswear, K & L Manufacturing which ultimately employed all of my sisters and brothers with part-time summer jobs during college.

My lawyer father Joe handled the company’s legal matters. The four Doohan kids Joe, Earl, Maura and Megan grew up with us and spent so much time at our Hayden Lake cabin that folks thought the place was theirs. Later on after my dad passed away,

Mike gave me away at the wedding when Doug and I were married in 2000. Winnie was my mother’s best friend and we all mourned her loss in 2000 when cancer took her ~ coincidentally on my birthday. I completed this piece as a special Christmas gift in 1987 to thank the Doohans for all the wonderful years of friendship.

Highlight ~ Mary Doohan, wife of oldest son Joe, has been a huge supporter and wonderful help to me over the years with her very kind patronage, research assistance and more.

 

EASTERN WASHINGTON AND NORTH IDAHO ~ 1 NEW! (LAKES IN EASTERN WASHINGTON AND NORTH IDAHO PLUS ONE W.S.U. SETTING)

Entire Eastern Washington/North Idaho Collection pdf ~ Click on this 3-page pdf to see all 14 paintings.

COEUR D'ALENE, HAYDEN AND PRIEST LAKES

NEW! "COEUR D'ALENE LAKE GETAWAY" (COEUR D'ALENE LAKE, ID • PAINTED JANUARY 2017 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 11X14-INCH)

Rockford Bay on Coeur d’Alene Lake was the setting for this lakeside portrait of family and friends at one of many 4th of July celebrations. Note the flag billowing from the deck, colorful pots of red geraniums and the comfy crimson Adirondack chairs by the fire pit ~ all in honor of the patriotic holiday.

Purchased in the early 2000s, this beloved home hosted years of fun times ~ creating unforgettable memories for the folks who owned it, their two daughters and nearby friends just down the beach.

There was always something to do around the property ~ from “home improvement” interior cabin projects to puttering on the beach to chopping wood by the shed to sunny days spent on the dock and riding in the Supra.

Pictured in the foreground was a friendly gang of good friends enjoying music by the beach fire while the golden retriever kept them company from the dock. Hot dogs, roasted marshmellows, tasty s'mores and lots of singing by the fire (note the fellow with the guitar) ~ what could be better after a long fun-filled day at the lake?

"SUMMER DAY AT SUNSET BEACH" (HAYDEN LAKE, ID • PAINTED JULY 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 9X12-INCH)

I pictured three generations of the Dix family who have owned this property for decades at Hayden Lake on beautiful Sunset Beach. This is how Kathleen Dix described a magical day there.

“It often starts in the morning before breakfast when many of us go water skiing. Then the fun of building sand castles begins ~ digging, making decorations in the sand and pushing toy boats around in the water.

Nothing’s better than a cold drink and a good read on a comfy chair under the umbrella. It’s great fishing right off the dock. Even a turtle or two can be caught nearby and released to see which one makes it back into the lake first.

As the sun dips below the skyline seen from our wonderful beach, the fire is built for roasting hot dogs ~ and of course, s’mores. The orange, red and golden hues make us smile as one more day at Sunset Beach comes to a end.”

Highlight ~ The Dix family bought their place at Sunset Beach a few decades after my parent's purchased their property in 1956, but have spent many, many summers as good neighbors down the beach from the Simpsons.

"RICH'S LAKESIDE LODGE" (PRIEST LAKE , IDAHO • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 1998 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When my parents downsized from their mid-century modern in the Spokane Valley suburbs, they chose a view condominium on Argonne Lane. Their next door neighbor was a friendly high school teacher named Rich who was close to retirement.

When that day finally arrived, Rich sold his unit and moved to a scenic spot on Priest Lake to share his life with his longtime love Linda. They married and together built a large new log home to replace the small one-room cottage that had served as a summer place on the lake’s shoreline.

Very old and riddled with dry rot, the cabin had become uninhabitable and dangerous, so it was slated for demolition.

Highlight ~ To surprise his bride, Rich took several photos of the place before it was torn down and commissioned this portrait. I pictured the couple on the front deck over looking an autumn scene dotted with wildlife.

"CAST & BLAST" (HAYDEN, IDAHO • PAINTED JULY 1999 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 11X14-INCH)

In the 1990s, this rustic log store located in the town of Hayden Lake was THE spot for bait, lures, rods, shells ~ and every possible gift item for the outdoor sports enthusiast.

Charming and cozy with the shop's walls covered with vintage outdoor treasures, folks passing through the community on their way to Spokane or all points east and north usually left the area with a fine memento of their time spent in the North Idaho "Panhandle" ~ thanks to the Cast & Blast.

I painted my sisters, Peggy, Marilee and myself in full fly-fishing gear ~ from vests to boots ~ in front of the shop. This was a bit of a stretch, as our summers spent for decades at Hayden were more about sunbathing, water skiing, and cruising around the lake in one of the mahogany Century boats so prevalent there in the 1950s and 1960s.

Sadly for all its customers, a short time after I painted this portrait, the unique shop locked its door for the last time. The owners retired to enjoy all of the activities their mercantile had supported for so many years ~ off to fly fish at some nearby pristine setting.

Highlight ~ Time moved on and this area became part of a shiny new strip mall, but many "lake people" remember this tiny destination fondly.

 

 

Click on the Red Pointer graphic header here to access "The BIG List" of ALL of the Spokane Collection artwork. Titles are listed in caps alphabetically by group and linked in bold red type to pages throughout this HOLIDAY edition of the web site.

 

 

 

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ARTWORK OR CONTENT?

iPhone ~ 206.406.1409 (Texts & Voicemail)

PittyPat Gallery & Studio ~ OPEN EARLY DECEMBER • HOLIDAY SEASON. Questions? Please phone me.

Email ~ artist@pattisimpsonward.com

On the Web ~ PattiSimpsonWard.com

Please Visit my Facebook Page "PattiSimpsonWardArt."

"