THE SEASON OF FIERY SEASONAL COLORS, BREEZY SKIES AND CRISP AIR!

AUTUMN! It's here at last with all the splendor that Mother Nature can share.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS ~ This time of year more than any promises vivid vistas large and small in every corner of the Pacific Northwest. Whether it's a short walk to nearby Manito Park or a train excursion through the colorful Cascades to Leavenworth's Oktoberfest, this season is truly a feast for ALL the senses.

As I shared on my Welcome page, Autumn is a very special time with its brilliantly colored falling leaves, pumpkins perched on every doorstep, shorter days that often end with eye-popping sunsets, and two favorite holidays ~ Halloween and Thanksgiving.

THE HEART OF AUTUMN COLLECTION below honors much of what this season has to offer. There are beautiful memories to be made for the next few months!

 

 

22 NEW PAINTINGS ~ Click here on the 2019-2018 All NEW Art Collection pdf to see thumbnail images of all the NEW paintings completed this year and last to date. Many of these works are also scattered throughout the Puget Sound, Spokane & More Paintings pages.

PITTYPAT GALLERY (OPEN) ~ My gallery is open by appointment and invitation now through the end of 2019. The work hanging there reflects the Heart of Autumn Collection featured on this web site's What's New page. There is also a generous selection of:

Please phone me at 206.406.1409 for more information about available items and to learn about commissioning original paintings and sketches.

V.I.P. MAILING LIST ~ To be on my V.I.P. list (Very Important Patron), please contact me at 206.406.1409 (talk/text).

Twice a year, I send postcards in digital email format or hard copy via the U.S. Mail. These feature NEW art images and share my schedule of Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter /Holiday venues. Frequently, the postcards offer special savings at upcoming art fests and private PittyPat Gallery events.

You can also find me on Facebook under "PattiSimpsonWardArt."

 

 

This collection of 24 paintings divided into six groupings of four images each celebrates Autumn! The fine art featured below is of settings sprinkled all over the Pacific Northwest. Each has its own special appeal and was created to honor this beloved vibrant season. Four of these images are NEW! Visit the Puget Sound, Spokane & More Paintings pages to see many more paintings celebrating Autumn!

 

COZY PLACES THAT WELCOME THIS SEASON BEAUTIFULLY • Spokane, Snohomish and Port Townsend, WA

"9TH AVENUE ~ PUMPKIN PIE PALACE • SHADEL-VEASEY HOUSE" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED APRIL 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This painting pictured my mother Sally, my sisters Peggy and Marilee and girlfriends in the neighborhood gathering at this handsome Tudor Revival three-story mansion Thanksgiving morning for a group, baking project. Shared recipes and traditional secrets inspired all of us to create several very tantalizing pumpkin pies for our family feasts scheduled for later in the afternoon.

The handsome home featured here was one of four similar Comstock-Shadle family residences built next to each other on Ninth Avenue, one block west of Monroe Street on the South Hill.

Esteemed architect Loren L. Rand designed James Comstock’s residence in 1905. 1906, he turned his attention to designing this residence next door to ~ the second Tudor beauty on the block. The other two similar home were created by Willis A. Ritchie.

Highlight ~ Both of these architects were acclaimed ~ L.L. Rand may be best known for Lewis & Clark High School and Willis A. Ritchie for the Spokane County Courthouse.

"FINE FALL FOURSQUARE • IVERSON HOUSE" (SNOHOMISH, WA • PAINTED APRIL 2010 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This was a portrait I painted in the early 2000a of the historic Iverson House, a fine home which was built in 1908 at 312 Avenue D. The three-story shingle construction residence in the historic district of Snohomish was a perfect, classic example of foursquare architectural styling.

This three-story residence was beautifully detailed with leaded glass windows and further enhanced by its handsome brick chimneys and columns flanking the front porch steps. The front yard was framed by a handsome wrought-iron fence with brick columns that matched those on the steps.

This pretty place was clearly loved by its owners as every room of the house and the surrounding grounds were in immaculate shape. Even the foliage framing the Foursquare was crisply clipped into perfect shape.

Highlight ~ I've always loveD this house, so when the leaves began changing colors, I started my piece, embellishing it with pumpkins perched all around the place.

"PUSSYCATS & PUMPKINS • JORDAN HOUSE" (SNOHOMISH, WA • MAY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVA S • 8X10-INCH)

On a walk one early November day in 2008, when I was shooting photos of prospective subjects for my Snohomish Collection, I met the owner of this pristine shingled two-story.

He was busy tidying up the yard and gardens in the front of his home, which his wife had embellished with a collection of bright orange pumpkins and other colorful, seasonal decorations.

He shared that, like so many other folks who make this picturesque community their home, they were true lovers of vintage architecture, and had relished the hours of careful work they had put into renovating this property. The historic Jordan House was built in 1890 at 326 Avenue C.

In the back yard of this piece, I painted myself by the gate of this cottage, letting myself into the front yard to bring the owners a piping hot pumpkin pie.

Highlight ~ Hotel registers with the signatures of President T. Roosevelt and John Wayne were preserved for history buffs who visiedt the setting.

"WYLIE HUSE AUTUMN WELCOME" (PORT TOWNSEND, WA • PAINTED JULY 2006 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This pretty little Victorian Queen Anne-style cottage just sparkled with imaginative detail and trim ~ from its second-story porch and French doors to its inviting bay windows on the first floor.

It was built in 1889 on 1406 Garfield Street for the Henry Wylie family, Sadly, Henry’s wife passed away very soon after the family moved into their pretty cottage in this delightful seaside community overlooking the water, causing them all to relocate back to Illinois in the Midwest.

The charming place looks quite small from the curb, but includes a parlor, a sitting room, kitchen, dining room and enclosed porch ~ all on the first floor ~ with several bedrooms located on the second story.

Highlight ~ This artwork celebrated the beautiful season of autumn, the tradition of raking colored leaves ~ with a welcome restoring “al-fresco” lunch as a reward for all the hard work!

 

 

ENJOYING THE BEAUTIFUL OUTDOORS • 2 NEW! Snohomiish, Redmond, WA and Hayden Lake, ID

NEW! "AUTUMN AT THE MANITO ADMIN. BUILDING (HEADHOUSE)" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 20198 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The stunning focal point of the South Hill neighborhood, Manito Park was deeded to the city of Spokane in 1904.

This handsome single-story basaltic rock and shingle Administration Building or “Headhouse” as it was also known, was constructed in 1912 on the north side of the Gaiser Conservatory, south of the Ferris Perennial Gardens and east of Rose Hill.

It was built to house the offices of Manito’s horticultural staff and The Friends of Manito (TheFriendsOfManito.org), a non-profit service group whose purpose was to help Spokane’s Parks & Rec. Department preserve, promote and improve the beloved setting.

Revised from the original artwork completed in 2003, this piece celebrated family enjoying the beautiful setting on a gorgeous Autumn afternoon.

"ANTICS AT ANDERSON PARK" (REDMOND, WA • PAINTED APRIL 2011 4• ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Anderson Park in the center of Redmond, Washington came about as a result of property deeded to the community in 1928 by School District No. 200 in 1928.

Originally named Redmond Town Park, it was later changed to Anderson Park to honor Albert “Andy” Anderson, the city’s first superintendent of parks.

Several uniquely beautiful rustic log cabins were built on the property. The structure pictured here was constructed in 1939 and named for Adair, the wife of Ezra Sikes, who donated additional property to enlarge the park in 1938. It was a fitting homage.

Highlight ~ I added our two grandchildren Austin and Addison to this scene, picturing them playing in the brilliantly colored leaves that covered the lawn of this beloved park.

NEW! "HISTORIC HAYDEN LAKE C.C. CLUBHOUSE • BOZANTA TAVERN" (HAYDEN LAKE, ID • PAINTED AUGUST 2019 • ACRYLIC ON CANVA S • 9X12-INCH)

Spokane businessmen J.P. Graves, F. Lewis Clark, architect Kirtland Kelsey Cutter, landscape architects the Olmsted Bros. of Brookline, MA and others began developing the western shore of Hayden Lake into “Little Switzerland” at the turn of the last century.

A branch line train connected the Idaho vacation area to Spokane, Washington. The resort included rustic cottages, an 18-hole golf course, the oldest in Idaho (HaydenLakeCC.com) and K.K. Cutter’s large Bozanta Tavern chalet-style inn. Constructed in 1907, it became the country club’s clubhouse in 1927.

When I painted the historic structure, it was still serving as the clubhouse for beautiful HLCC ~ and had just received a polishing.

Highlight ~ Legendary actor and crooner Bing Crosby (”White Christmas”), who over the years owned a number of vacation homes on the lake, invited many of his Hollywood cronies like Bob Hope to play golf here in summertime.

"VINTAGE VIEW OF COEUR D'ALENE PARK" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • OCTOBER 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 9X12-INCH)

This autumn-themed artwork portrayed how I imagined Spokane’s first and oldest park, Coeur d’Alene, might have looked in the early 1900s. Several wealthy Browne’s Addition residents made their fortunes in the Coeur d’Alene mines, perhaps inspiring its name. Researching how the first pavilion and period clothing looked, I painted merrymakers listening to music, strolling leisurely, bicycling and riding in the elegant carriage based on the one owned by the Amasa Campbell family.

Although the four-block parcel was set aside by developers A.M. Cannon and J.J. Browne in the 1880s, the park was not officially deeded until 1891. In the early 1900s, John Charles Olmsted and Frederick Dawson of the famed Olmsted Bros. offered several suggestions to improve the park, including reducing the drives through it and the addition of a bandstand pavilion.

This was replaced very similarly to the original plans and rededicated in 1990 with two of the handsome urn-shaped planters seen in many early park photographs flanking it.

The park was also renowned for its collection of one of nearly every type of tree native to the Northwest.

Highlight ~ 2016 marked the 125th anniversary of the park’s founding with celebrations driven by the stewardship group, the Friends of Coeur d’Alene Park.

 

UNFORGETABLE LANDMARKS ~ BOTH FUN AND PRESTIGIOUS • Spokane, Seattle and Woodinville, WA

"DALLYING AT THE DAVENPORT" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • OCTOBER 2008 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 8X10-INCH)

gave this artwork a late 1940s timeframe, painting Louis M. Davenport's legendary hotel in the heart of downtown Spokane as it looked decades ago.To the right is the Pennington Hotel and at the forefront, Davenport’s luxurious restaurant.

Designed by famed architect, Kirtland K. Cutter, the Davenport Hotel (TheDavenportHotel.com) opened in 1914 to become an icon on Spokane’s skyline for decades.

With Davenport’s death in 1951, the hotel was sold to the company that owned Seattle's grand Olympic Hotel, but it gradually declined and finally closed 1985.

After years of neglect and possible demolition, Walt and Karen Worthy purchased it in 2000. After countless hours of renovation, restoration and careful attention to detail, they reopened the grand “lady” in 2002, giving Spokane and all of its visitors back this truly remarkable treasure. (Photo used courtesy of the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture • MAC.)

"PIONEER SQUARE PERGOLA" (SEATTLE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2002 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Seattle’s pergola was designed to be the focal point of downtown Seattle's Pioneer Square (PioneerSquare.org).

In early 2001, a large delivery truck accidentally clipped the 91-year-old structure, pulling the ornate cast-iron structure to the ground. A team of fine craftsmen restored this beloved landmark, finishing the project in record time just a year later. Folks of all ages were just delighted. Pioneer Square has always been a beloved downtown destination ~ especially during the holiday season when tiny white fairy lights sparkled everywhere.

Highlight ~ I pictured my visiting teenage niece Kelly Barton taking a break from shopping with high school chums Lauren, Bonnie and Katie. Remarkably, several years later, Bonnie's father went on to our contractor when we purchased and restored our vintage bungalow in Eastern Washington.

NEW! "LEMONADE & LORIENS ON PERRY STREET" (THE PERRY DISTRICT, SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2019 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The historic Cambern Dutch Shop was one of several windmill buildings constructed by Charles Wood ~ once employed by famed architect Kirtland K. Cutter. 13 of these novelty commercial architecture” structures were designed and 9 were built.

This one at 1102 South Perry was in immaculate condition when I painted its portrait. In the mid-1920s, brothers Robert and Cecil Cambern housed their bakery/dairy business in the windmill buildings until they closed in 1934 due to financial failure brought on by the Great Depression.

When I created this artwork, Lorien Herbs & Natural Foods (LorienHerbs.com) had been doing business here since 1977.

In keeping with the vintage theme of this piece, I paired the windmill with pal Linda Ebner’s campy green and yellow trailer, dressed as a friendly lemonade stand. This was created to honor her milestone birthday and she’s pictured with her husband and lifelong friends.

Highlight ~ Spokane’s Perry Street windmill was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

"HEYDAY AT THE HOLLYWOOD SCHOOLHOUSE" (WOODINVILLE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2011 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This two-story brick schoolhouse was constructed in 1912 with lumber donated by successful millionaire, Frederick Stimson.

As handsome as ever when I finished this portrait of it, the Hollywood Schoolhouse (HollywoodSchoolhouse.com) was repurposed in Woodinville’s popular “Wine Country” district and went on to house the tasting room of the Alexandria Nicole Cellars in the basement of the beloved structure.

On the main and second floors, it became an event center for weddings and other special events ~ a beautiful choice because of the many large windows on both floors.

The image shared here was a revision of an earlier piece I completed in 2000 for Lt. Governor Brad Owen and Linda Owen’s “Children at Play” exhibit at the State Capitol’s Legislative Building. I added colorful flower-filled grounds, more of the school’s pleasing architectural details and young uniformed students enjoying recess in the fresh air.

 

BELOVED PLACES OF WORSHIP AND BACK TO SCHOOL! • Spokane and Seattle, WA

"EVENING AT ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST" (CATHEDRAL DISTRICT, THE SOUTH HILL • SEPTEMBER 2007 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The dream of Right Reverend Edward Makin Cross (Third Bishop of Spokane), the St. John the Evangelist (StJohns-Cathedral.org) building project was begun in 1925 by architect and parishioner Harold C. Whitehouse on property that once housed Spokane dynamo Francis Cook's Victorian mansion on the brow of the South Hill.

Whitehouse was also responsible for two whimsical Benewah Creamery buildings and the Hutton Settlement Orphanage buildings in Spokane Valley.

This majestic Gothic-style cathedral was French-influenced. Its exterior was constructed of stone from Tacoma, Washington, and the interior with sandstone from Idaho (the nave) and limestone from Indiana. Work on the building project proceeded through most of the 1920s.

The cathedral always prided itself on opening its doors to everyone ~ as its carvings and stain-glass windows included symbols of many faiths. It was built to be a “house of prayer for all people.”

Highlight ~ The spires of this church has always been a highly recognizable landmark visible from the I-90 freeway for folks driving through the community on their travels further east.

"CLASSMATES AT COLLEGE HALL • GONZAGA UNIVERSITY" ~ (UNIVERSITY DISTRICT, THE NORTH SIDE • PAINTED JUNE 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.edu) owes its beginning to Italian-born missionary Fr. Joseph Cataldo, S.J. Often in poor health, he was a dynamo nonetheless and was appointed General Superior of the Rocky Mountain Mission in 1877 (eight residences and 38 members scattered throughout the Northwest).

Competition with Protestants for access to local Native American tribes was the main reason for founding a Jesuit college in Spokane. When it opened, applicants had to “know how to read and write, and not be under ten years of age.” Originally only white students were permitted to enroll.

Railroad land was purchased in 1881, Gonzaga began educating in 1887, and was it incorporated and able to grant degrees by 1896. A permanent residence and four-story building was completed by 1899. Handsome, stately “College Hall” is still the key building on today’s beautiful campus.

The hall’s entrance has been further enhanced in April 2008 by the dedication of George Carlson’s Saint Ignatius statue, a reflection pool and new landscaping.

"OKTOBERFEST AT CATALDO" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2006 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Once St. Augustine’s Grade School (StAug.org), the name was changed to Cataldo Catholic School when it began to accept youngsters from not only St. Augustine’s parish, but also from Sacred Heart and Our Lady of Lourdes.

The brick three-story was designed by Kirtland K. Cutter in 1914 to serve as the church, parish hall, convent and school. In 1950, a new church on the east side of the block was dedicated and the old structure became the grade school.

Soon afterwards, an addition to the old Cutter building was added it to house the music department and convent for the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. With the departure of the sisters as educators, the space was repurposed into offices and gymnasium, which doubled as the parish hall. Saint Augustine’s School educated hundreds of South Hill kids ~ now parents and grandparents of the children who went on to attend the renamed Cataldo Catholic School in the years that followed.

Highlight ~ My sister-in-law Jan suggested this piece depicting the annual parish Oktoberfest parish festival. I pictured my nephew Scot and niece Isabel when they were youngsters with their classmates (girls in plaid and boys in navy) in the foreground.

"AUTUMN AT THE ACADEMY THROUGH THE YEARS" (CAPITOL HILL, SEATTLE, WA • PAINTED FEBRUARY 2010 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 9X12-INCH)

In 1880, Holy Names Academy (HolyNames-Sea.org) was founded by the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary under the guidance of Mother Marie Rose Durocher.

In 1859, the sisters came to Oregon. About 20 years later. they established a school (23 students to start) in Seattle at Second & Seneca Streets. As the city and student body grew, the school relocated ~ finally settling for good on the east side of Capitol Hill. Albert Beitung designed the majestic structure in the neo-classical style, and in 1906, under the leadership of Sister Mary Leontine, ground was broken. Bishop Edward J. O’Dea presided as the cornerstone was laid in 1907. The building was dedicated in 1908.

Originally housing 12 grades and a Normal School, the Academy grew, met challenges and adapted to the changing world. Staying abreast of the times, Holy Names Academy continued to offer an up-to-date college-prep curriculum, while grounding students in the values that have ensured its success moving forward.

Highlight ~ This painting pictured staff and classmates from three generations ~ (L-R) 1930s (serge frocks), 1950s (jumpers), and 1970s (wool skirts & blazers). The 1970s group included guests from Spokane’s academy ~ thus the two different skirt plaids.

 

THE SPOOKIEST, MAGICAL AUTUMN HOLIDAY! • 1 NEW! Spokane, Snohomish and Port Townsend, WA

NEW! "WITCHES ON WOODIES AT CORBIN PARK" (THE NORTH SIDE • PAINTED JULY s2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Corbin Park Historic District has been a unique pocket of homes on Spokane’s North Side since the early 1900s when Daniel C. Corbin developed the neighborhood.

The park was once the Washington-Idaho Fairgrounds and Racetrack from 1886 to 1897.

This three-story Queen Anne was the first residence ~ constructed there, created in 1902 by prominent builder Harry J. Skinner for his family. He built several others in the neighborhood which was eventually named on the Local, State and National Registers of Historic Places.

Highlight ~ Corbin Park has become THE Halloween destination in Spokane with most of its residences (many different architectural styles line the park) decorated for this favorite Autumn holiday to host thousands (10,000+) of wee goblin trick-or-treaters ~ thus the theme of this piece.

"SPOOKY STEVENS HOUSE" (SNOHOMISH, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2012 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Built in 1887, the Stevens House has always been one of the most classic beauties in the center of Snohomish’s historic district.

Owner John F. Stevens was a famous engineer who worked for James J. Hill, CEO of the Great Northern Railroad. Known as  “The Empire Builder,” Hill dominated his industry.

Stevens’ considerable accomplishments include building a thousand miles of railroad for the Stevens Pass Highway, including the original Cascade Tunnel. Stevens Pass was named for him, but he also discovered Marias Pass over the Continental Divide.

Later, with James Hill’s recommendation, Stevens was hired by President Theodore Roosevelt to finish the Panama Canal after the work there foundered, building the infrastructure necessary to complete that project. The Stevens House stands in the shade of two enormous trees in the front yard, presenting the perfect setting for this Halloween-themed painting. 

"WACKY WITCHES BALL" (PORT TOWNSEND, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I painted this seasonal-themed painting to honor October 31st and the magical fun of celebrating Halloween. It featured four wacky witches and their black cats brewing up a deliciously good time in celebration of “spookiness”!

From the caldron on the second floor to the pumpkins marching across the ridgepole of the roof, this piece captured nicely the essence of this Autumn "All Hallowed Eve" holiday.

I decorated the mansion with a over a dozen jack-o-lanterns and a banner welcoming the witches to the ball. The moon was a sliver in the midnight sky, barely lighting the bats that were circling the mansion.

The uniqe mansion featured here was located just around the corner from the beloved Frank Hastings House (known in Port Townsend as the German Consulate) which was serving guests as the Old Consulate Inn when I finished this seasonal portrait. Both residences overlooked the harbor below from this historic district hillside.

This remarkable, shingle-construction, three-story was just one of a handful of Victorians constructed in the community with a mansard-style roof.

Highlight ~ In the 1980s, my sister Marilee suggested this artwork when we were in Port Townsend attending one of their Tours of Historic Homes.

"TRICK OR TREATING ON 25TH & BERNARD"(THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2002 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Dutch-Colonial-style Codd House has always been one of most striking homes on Bernard Street and 25th Avenue on Spokane’s South Hill. Our Simpson family (only five out of six kids at the time) lived there for a decade from 1952 to 1962.

I always loved this home and painted five portraits of it ~ this one celebrating Halloween with costumed kids on their way up our walk to collect goodies from my dad “The Ghoul.”

Built as a wedding gift by Dr. Codd for his newlywed son in the 1920s, the home featured beautiful gumwood trim, built-in bookcases and French doors on the main floor.

When our family outgrew our cottage on Lincoln, my parents bought this two-story and began face-lifting it with new wallpaper, paint, slip-covers and more, giving it a warm “English Country” feel.

When the city widened Bernard and it became a very busy arterial, our family moved. It was purchased by the Sullivans and later in 2002 by the Starbucks, who put a great deal of time and effort into renovating it.

Highlight ~ When I finished this portrait in the early 2000s, it brought back lots of memories for my sisters Marilee and Peggy who recalled Halloweens spent there as youngsters. The neighborhood was filled with kids so it was great for trick or treating!

 

CELEBRATING THIS BLESSED, HEARTFELT FAMILY HOLIDAY • Spokane, Port Townsend and Snohomish, WA

"DINING WITH THE DOOHAN'S • FERRIS HOUSE" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED AUGUST 2006 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8x10-INCH)

This painting pictured the historic Ferris House, a classic Dutch Colonial two-story located between Bernard Street and Grand Boulevard on 13th Avenue near St. John the Evangelist Cathedral.

It was purchased by Joe and Mary Doohan (pictured on their front porch) and became their family home where they raised their four children after moving to the South from a charming Victorian they had renovated by Gonzaga University.

This artwork celebrated Thanksgiving with Joe’s parents Mike and Winnie, my mother Sally and Doug and me arriving to join the family for a traditional turkey dinner. This was one of four home portraits I created for Joe and Mary over the years.

Highlight ~ Joe and Mike had been dear friends of my parents for decades and I remember when the couple brought Joe home as a small infant. He and my youngest brother brother Bob grew up together and became great chums when our family moved to the Spokane Valley.

”HARVEST CELEBRATION AT THE HOGG HOUSE" (PORT TOWNSEND, WA • PAINTED NOVEMBER 2003 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This painting featured the J.B. Hogg House which I completed with a Thanksgiving theme.

The decorative two-story grey-shingled home was full of quaint personality and one of the prettier historic Victorians for which Port Townsend has always been well known. At one point, the cottage was a group home to several Roman Catholic priests who enclosed the right side of the second floor to creat a sleeping area.

Each year, the Puget Sound community took great pride in hosting a well-attended tour of its beautiful landmark homes. Cameras in hand, visitors arrived from all over the Pacific Northwest to wander the neighborhoods, explore the interiors and snap photos of the beautifully restored residences.

The perfect setting for a family feast, I pictured my husband Doug and me in the window enjoying a quick holiday hug before our guests arrive for Thanksgiving and a traditional turkey dinner with all the trimmings! The cottage was decorated with an Autumn theme with pumpkins, shocks of wheat and more.

Highlight ~ This painting was my second effort at a portrait ~ the first one picturing it as a snow-covered bed & breakfast celebrating Winter.

”HANDSOME HANSEN HOUSE" (SNOHOMISH, WA • PAINTED MAY 2009 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This three-story residence with the half-timbered top floor gable and front porch was one of the most striking homes (both inside and out) in the historic district of Snohomish.

The exterior of the residence was enhanced with river-rock masonry at its entrance flanked by two large planters filled with brilliant colorful foliage.

When my sister Marilee and I toured the residence during the holiday season in the mid-2000s, it was imaginatively decorated with vintage music boxes and toys, an antique Christmas village and much more. No one on the tour that year breezed through this home's main floor, as there was so much to see and marvel at.

The N.P. Hansen House was built in 1906 on a slightly sloping hillside at 1314 4th Street. Its lot was prominent just around the corner from Snohomish High School.

Highlight ~ A favorite with visitors, this mansion has been featured on the Snohomish Historical Society’s Holiday Homes Tour more than once.

”AUTUMN AFTERNOON AT PATSY CLARK'S" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • MARCH 1997 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Patrick Clark Mansion across from the Coeur d’Alene Park on 2nd Avenue and Hemlock Street was the fine work of architect Kirtland Kelsey Cutter. The flamboyant design of this three-story residence was inspired by the palaces of Islamic Spain. Constructed beige-gold brick with a crimson tile roof, it stood out dramatically in a neighborhood of Tudor-Revivals and Queen Anne Victorians.

Born in Ireland of poor parents, 20-year old Patrick Clark arrived in the United States in 1870 and chose mining for his career path. He worked in several states before joining a Spokane syndicate, partnering with high-profile businessmen Finch, Campbell, Wakefield and Corbin.

He moved his family into this opulent mansion in 1897 after living temporarily in the Fotheringham House across the street directly east. For a time in the 1980s and 1990s, the residence was a very popular fine restaurant named after him.

Later on in the 2000s, the grand mansion was purchased by a group of successful attorneys who installed their offices on the second floor. A further renovation and restoration was completed, making the first floor a sought after event center for weddings and other social functions. These attorneys just placed the historic up for sale.

Highlight ~ When Doug and I were courting in 1997, I brought him to Spokane to meet my mother Sally. We chose Patsy Clark's as our restaurant for that special introductory dinner.

 

 

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